Leeanna Wals­man

Herald Sun - Switched On - - ON THE BOX - ANNA BRAIN NA­TIONAL TV WRITER

Leeanna Wals­man, 37, is a vet­eran of Aussie TV, film and theatre, yet she man­ages to keep a very low pro­file. That might be about to change as she takes a lead­ing role as Anna in the ABC’s thrilling new drama Seven Types of Ambiguity.

I’m a ball of ten­sion after watch­ing this ... I love that each episode is told from a dif­fer­ent per­spec­tive. It’s a style that kind of came from The Slap, but it’s re­ally hon­est, isn’t it? It’s how we all walk around, not know­ing what other peo­ple are think­ing. My pre­dom­i­nant episode is the last one, ap­par­ently it’s the most stress­ful out of all of them.

The ini­tial sce­nario — a child go­ing miss­ing — is night­mare stuff. I don’t have chil­dren, but I can imag­ine in my heart that it would be the worst thing that would ever hap­pen. With the love that I feel for my niece, and my fam­ily, the love that I see my friends feel for their chil­dren, I imag­ine that there wouldn’t be a greater loss. If that’s the case, then it’s about pain and fear. I hope I did a good job.

The cast is amaz­ing, had you worked with any of them be­fore? No. They’re all in­cred­i­ble, es­pe­cially Hugo Weav­ing, Xavier Sa­muel, Susie Porter and Alex Dim­i­tri­ades. There’s no weak link. Hope­fully it’s not me, be­cause it’s def­i­nitely none of them. Hugo Weav­ing, it’s hard not to fall in love with the man. Ev­ery­thing he em­anates, ev­ery­thing you are at­tracted to on screen, whether it’s good or bad, is ev­ery­thing that you get from hu­man to hu­man. It’s not act­ing, he’s very, very lovely.

You man­age to keep a low pro­file, is that a con­scious de­ci­sion? I just don’t think peo­ple are that in­ter­ested. I don’t have any high-pro­file af­fairs or con­tro­versy. That’s nice, ac­tu­ally. I think my work is much more in­ter­est­ing. I’m quite a pri­vate per­son, I have a close-knit group of friends, and even though I love to go to events, maybe I don’t go to as many as I should, I don’t know.

Do you watch your own work? Oh for sure, and you’re in­cred­i­bly judg­men­tal of your­self. A lot of the time it’s not as you thought (it was) on the day. I’m al­ways com­pletely in­se­cure about what I’ll be do­ing. It’s al­ways hard. you’re in­cred­i­bly judg­men­tal of your­self. Re­cently I was with a friend who’s never seen me in any­thing, and I picked up a scene in Look­ing For Ali­brandi (2000) that

I re­alised I hadn’t watched since it came out. I feel like I’m prob­a­bly old enough now to dif­fer­en­ti­ate be­tween think­ing I was a bad ac­tor and re­al­is­ing my youth. I’m very keen to watch that ac­tu­ally.

WATCH SEVEN TYPES OF AMBIGUITY, ABC, THURS­DAY, 8.30PM

“I’m quite a pri­vate per­son, I have a close-knit group of friends”

LEEANNA WALS­MAN KEEPS A LOW PRO­FILE

Leeanna Wals­man is her own harshest critic.

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