THE PER­FECT PAR­ENT MYTH

Highfields' Own - - Children's Collective - BY LIZ WALSH

If there’s one thing that makes a per­fect par­ent, it’s im­per­fec­tion: so says one of the most recog­nis­able global par­ent­ing ex­perts, Jo Frost.

Frost (pic­tured) be­came a no-non­sense phe­nom­e­non with the world­wide tele­vi­sion se­ries Su­per­nanny.

She told The Ad­ver­tiser from her Lon­don home that the “smoke and mir­rors” of so­cial me­dia only added to the pres­sures to be the per­fect par­ent. “The re­al­ity is ... messier,” Jo says. “The per­fect par­ent doesn’t ex­ist; no one is per­fect. “We all screw up, we make mis­takes, we get a bit lazy. “I un­der­stand and cel­e­brate that (sort of) par­ent but, at the same time, I don’t think it’s okay to cel­e­brate not do­ing any­thing all the time.”

She said the most com­mon mis­take mod­ern-day par­ents made was us­ing quick fixes to curb their child’s be­hav­iour.

“We live in the kind of world where we want im­me­di­ate grat­i­fi­ca­tion, we want ev­ery­thing yes­ter­day and that our tech­niques will work in five min­utes. “But there are no short­cuts in par­ent­ing. “If you make a de­ci­sion and it’s a quick fix, it turns around and bites you on the bum.”

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