POR­TRAY­ING YOUR HOME IN A POS­I­TIVE LIGHT WHEN SELL­ING

Highfields' Own - - Real Estate -

Ev­ery year, around 500,000 houses are sold in Aus­tralia, the Re­serve Bank of Aus­tralia es­ti­mates.

You can be sure that sev­eral of th­ese prop­er­ties have their own unique quirks that may not be to the lik­ing of some buy­ers. And yet they still sell.

Per­haps this is be­cause buy­ers aren’t picky, but it’s more likely a re­sult of the work done by the seller and their agent to present the prop­erty in the right way, says Ray White.

You can do the same — th­ese tips help shed some light on how to por­tray your home’s quirks in a pos­i­tive light when sell­ing.

MAKE SECLU­SION WORK TO YOUR AD­VAN­TAGE

Aus­tralia is mas­sive – it’s area clocks in at almost 8000sq km.

Un­der­stand­ably, there are count­less homes here in far flung ar­eas, up wind­ing drive­ways, down long coun­try roads.

Tak­ing time to in­crease your home’s street ap­peal could be the key to turn­ing your home’s seclu­sion into a pos­i­tive.

Pay close at­ten­tion to your gar­den and your home’s frontage be­fore sell­ing, as you want the first im­pres­sion to be wor­thy of the jour­ney buy­ers make.

Whether it’s a vine-tan­gled trel­lis, bird baths and fairy lights in the gar­den, or a new paint job for your home’s ex­te­rior.

The first im­pres­sion your prop­erty cre­ates will help turn the lo­ca­tion from iso­lated to se­cluded and pic­turesque.

LEAVE YOUR FURRY FRIENDS OUT OF IT

There are more pets than peo­ple in Aus­tralia, 26 mil­lion, ac­cord­ing to the RSPCA’S es­ti­mates.

While we might be an an­i­mal-lov­ing na­tion, home-buy­ers are often cau­tious when they see any signs of pets hav­ing lived in a home.

Many take it as an in­di­ca­tion the prop­erty could be a lit­tle worse for wear.

Luck­ily this is a quick fix. Sim­ply drop Mit­tens off at the ken­nel or a friend’s house while you’re host­ing open homes and do your best to re­pair any pet-re­lated dam­age you can see.

SPICE UP YOUR IN­TE­RIOR

Is your home a lit­tle long in the tooth?

If your in­te­rior’s dated, it doesn’t mean the end of the world. In fact, by stag­ing your prop­erty you could turn ‘an­cient’ into ‘charm­ing’, and ‘out­dated’ into ‘quaint’.

About 96 per cent of re­spon­dents in a Na­tional As­so­ci­a­tion of Real­tors sur­vey said that stag­ing ei­ther ‘usu­ally’ or ‘some­times’ has an af­fect on a buyer’s view of the prop­erty.

So, if you’re a lit­tle wor­ried about your in­te­rior, hir­ing a pro­fes­sional stager to fix it up could solve your prob­lems.

MAX­IMISE STOR­AGE SPACE

Home-buy­ers love stor­age. Ev­ery cup­board is peered in­side and imag­ined as a place to keep ex­tra things — old photo al­bums, a sec­ond set of cut­lery, un­used Christ­mas gifts from sec­ond cousins or ex­tra linen.

If your cup­boards are over­filled, con­sider mov­ing some of your things out of your home dur­ing the sale.

Stor­age that’s empty or half full will ap­pear far larger than if it’s burst­ing at the seams with your pos­ses­sions.

MAKE THE MOST OF YOUR MINIA­TURE YARD

Your home’s small out­door area can be a draw for buy­ers if you take a lit­tle care when pre­sent­ing it.

Re­move clut­ter like gar­den hoses, child’s toys, gar­den­ing equip­ment and you’ll make it ap­pear larger.

Take time to frame them cor­rectly and buy­ers will ap­pre­ci­ate the dif­fer­ence.

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