Zim­bab­weans cel­e­brate in Perth

Hills Gazette (Kalamunda) - - FRONT PAGE - Lucy Jarvis

MO­BILE phones and na­tional flags were the weapons of choice for Zim­bab­weans cam­paign­ing for po­lit­i­cal change both in the coun­try and abroad.

Zim­babwe-born peo­ple living in Perth cel­e­brated news on Tues­day night that Robert Mu­gabe (93) re­signed as pres­i­dent, af­ter 37 years in power.

For many, in­clud­ing For­rest­field’s Michael Taremba (32), Mr Mu­gabe was the coun­try’s only leader they had known.

The army took con­trol last week af­ter vice-pres­i­dent Em­mer­son Mnan­gagwa was sacked and peo­ple had gath­ered en masse for peace­ful marches in Zim­bab­wean cities and over­seas, in­clud­ing Perth, on Satur­day.

Mr Taremba said there was ex­cite­ment with a feel­ing of cau­tious­ness about what lies ahead, as the coun­try re­cov­ers from the “dol­drums”.

“It was all non-vi­o­lent,” he said, com­mend­ing the way peo­ple main­tained peace.

Mr Mu­gabe’s res­ig­na­tion let­ter was read out in par­lia­ment shortly af­ter the rul­ing party ZANU-PF started an im­peach­ment process on Tues­day.

Op­po­si­tion Leader Mor­gan Ts­van­gi­rai said the res­ig­na­tion opened “a new tra­jec­tory for the coun­try” where he hoped peo­ple would be re­spected and the rule of law up­held.

Mr Ts­van­gi­rai said that should in­clude a tran­si­tional gov­ern­ment in the lead-up to the next elec­tions.

Mr Taremba said the change would al­low in­vest­ment to take place and re­store busi­ness con­fi­dence.

“It’s go­ing to be for the bet­ter­ment of one and all in terms of the econ­omy,” he said.

He re­cently vis­ited rel­a­tives who still live in Zim­babwe and hoped the change would lead to a bet­ter out­come “not just for the cur­rent gen­er­a­tion but for gen­er­a­tions to come”.

Zim­babwe-born peo­ple gath­ered in Perth on Satur­day to sup­port the cam­paign for change.

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