GARDEN PLAN­NER

Our green-thumbed ex­pert Mered­ith Kir­ton shares her must-do gar­den­ing list for Novem­ber.

Homes+ (Australia) - - CONTENTS -

A what-to-do-now list from ex­pert Mered­ith Kir­ton.

GARDEN AD­VICE WEEK 1

Mur­raya blooms three times a year, so after the Novem­ber flow­er­ing trim strag­gly growth and ap­ply blood and bone to the drip line of each plant.

WEEK 2

Dis­play a flow­er­ing branch of frangi­pani out of wa­ter in­doors for weeks. But first leave it out­side for a few hours un­til the milky white sap has stopped bleed­ing.

WEEK 3

After its spring flow­er­ing, trim back Chi­nese star jas­mine with hedg­ing shears – but re­mem­ber to wear gloves and glasses as the sap can be ir­ri­tat­ing.

WEEK 4

Mulch fra­grant gar­de­nias well and feed reg­u­larly with gar­de­nia food or spray monthly with Ep­som salts dis­solved in wa­ter. Trim spent flow­ers just be­low the bud for an au­tumn flush.

IN THE VEGIE PATCH WEEK 1

As the weather warms, grow leafy greens in a shel­tered po­si­tion. Cover let­tuce with a cloche or shade cloth to pre­vent it bolt­ing into flower and go­ing to seed, which makes it taste bit­ter.

WEEK 2

To re­duce the chance of dis­ease in your tomato plants, pinch off the lat­er­als – or in­ter­nal shoots – as they grow, and re­move the lower leaves.

WEEK 3

An­chor beans, pota­toes and leeks by hilling or slightly mound­ing soil around their stems. Pick beans as they crop: the more you cut the more you’ll reap.

WEEK 4

Sac­ri­fice a few zuc­chini so you can eat the flow­ers in­stead. They’re de­li­cious lightly bat­tered and fried, or stuffed with herbed cheese and steamed.

Cap­sicum Cu­cum­ber Broc­coli Straw­ber­ries Squash

Tasty trio

A pot of oregano, rose­mary or sage is a prac­ti­cal pressie.

Fuss-free frangi­pani For stun­ning and fra­grant blooms, give this trop­i­cal beauty sandy soil, sun and not too much wa­ter.

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