TREND ALERT

What’s the se­cret to mak­ing this new trend work? We asked James Tre­ble.

Homes+ (Australia) - - CONTENTS -

How make a black kitchen work for you.

THE KITCHEN IS THE MOST im­por­tant room in the house. It has to per­form a lot of func­tions and is a space we use ev­ery day, hence its role as the hub of the home where all the fam­ily con­gre­gates. Your kitchen is of­ten the most ex­pen­sive room but one that adds the most value, which is why get­ting the look right is es­sen­tial.

“Far from drab, dark cabinetry can re­ally pack a punch, as well as an el­e­gant and stylish feel,” says James. “It looks re­ally so­phis­ti­cated with con­trast­ing tim­ber floors or stone.”

The black-on-black trend ex­tends to a wide range of af­ford­able tap­ware and ac­ces­sories, which can add drama to a lighter kitchen but can also work very well in an all-black lay­out. Black ap­pli­ances and sinks come in a va­ri­ety of styles. Then there’s the power of con­trast­ing matt black with gloss. James says this sub­tle dif­fer­ence adds “in­ter­est and mood and plays with light”, which can make a sim­ple kitchen de­sign ready for the pages of a magazine. While most of us would have an idea of where to start with a white kitchen, black seems a lit­tle more daunt­ing. Over to James...

WHEN DE­SIGN­ING A MAINLY BLACK KITCHEN, WHAT DO YOU NEED TO TAKE INTO AC­COUNT?

“As al­ways, con­sider your sur­round­ings be­cause good de­sign needs to have con­text. Look at how it will fit in with the sur­round­ing room/s and the rest of the house. You could al­ways add some black fea­ture fur­ni­ture pieces or art­work, or maybe even a black fea­ture wall on the other side of the room to help bal­ance the look.”

HOW DO YOU AVOID A BLACK KITCHEN BE­COM­ING GLOOMY?

“The all-black kitchen works very well with nat­u­ral fin­ishes like raw tim­ber. These can be added in a sim­ple way through styling – chop­ping boards, wooden fruit bowls or even tim­ber-topped stools. Met­als also work re­ally well to bounce light around and add a dif­fer­ent el­e­ment to the de­sign. Stain­less-steel bench­tops, metal han­dles and, of course, stain­less-steel ap­pli­ances can all fit the bill.”

DO YOU MATCH OR CON­TRAST TAPS AND SPLASH­BACKS?

“Adding tex­ture in any room is im­por­tant so you could try black mo­saic tiles, or sub­way tiles to con­trast against the smoother pro­file cab­i­nets. Glass is a non-grout al­ter­na­tive, but if you re­ally want to cre­ate a show­stop­per, add a mir­rored splash­back be­cause they work so well with black kitchens. They pro­vide a re­flec­tive sur­face with a slightly grey­ish tint. Some­thing like the tough­ened mir­ror by De­coGlaze will add depth, mak­ing the room feel larger.”

WHAT TYPES OF FLOOR­ING WORK BEST WITH A BLACK SCHEME?

“I love the depth and warmth of tim­ber floors with black kitchens.

They help bal­ance the deep tone and

pre­vent the look from feel­ing too som­bre. Washed grey tones such as oak work per­fectly but Aus­tralian favourites, spot­ted gum and black­butt, also look re­ally fan­tas­tic. Tiles are al­ways pop­u­lar and func­tional in kitchens and l love the ad­di­tion of some pat­tern in a her­ring­bone or chevron to help bal­ance an all-black kitchen. A pat­terned floor, be­ing a busier fin­ish, works well with a sin­gle colour back­ground.”

WHAT ABOUT THE BENCH­TOP?

“Cae­sar­stone ‘Jet Black’ works beau­ti­fully in a black kitchen, but if you want some sub­tle vein de­tail to el­e­vate the look to luxe, I love Vanilla Noir. For nat­u­ral stone, Car­rara mar­ble and gran­ite al­ways look stun­ning. I love Black and White Vein gran­ite and you can’t go wrong with clas­sic In­dian Jet Black gran­ite. Both come in a leather fin­ish, adding an­other tex­tu­ral sur­face that’s easy to main­tain and feels amaz­ing to touch.”

HOW DO YOU AVOID STREAKY COUN­TERS AND CUP­BOARDS?

“Tex­tured lam­i­nates in black tim­ber grains are great at hid­ing fin­ger marks, and semi-gloss or satin are al­ways eas­ier to main­tain than high-gloss cab­i­nets be­cause the fin­ger marks don’t show as much. For bench­tops, man­u­fac­tured stone prod­ucts such as Cae­sar­stone or Es­sa­s­tone are easy to main­tain and the darker colours al­low you to go black with no prob­lems as they have a low-sheen fin­ish.”

ANY TIPS ON US­ING A MIX OF MATT BLACK AND GLOSS BLACK?

“I love us­ing gloss with matt and do it all the time. It’s very ef­fec­tive to add some drama with­out in­tro­duc­ing new colours. You could use matt or satin polyurethane cab­i­nets with gloss tiles in the splash­back, or you could eas­ily swap this and have gloss cabinetry with matt tiles, al­though I al­ways pre­fer gloss to be used in small amounts. I think it is best used as a dra­matic high­light as gloss can be­come over­whelm­ing.”

DO YOU THINK A BLACK KITCHEN WILL DATE QUICKLY?

“If a kitchen is well-made and de­signed with clean lines it won’t be­come out­dated so quickly. Fin­ishes such as flat pro­file doors and sim­ple lines in your han­dles and ap­pli­ances will al­ways help de­signs to sit well in the room over time.”

CAN YOU UP­DATE YOUR EX­IST­ING KITCHEN WITH A TOUCH OF BLACK?

“Yes, you can eas­ily add some black de­tails to an ex­ist­ing kitchen to give it more punch. Up­dat­ing the splash­back with stylish black sub­way tiles is an easy and ef­fec­tive way of do­ing this, as is paint­ing the sur­round­ing wall of your kitchen in black to add con­trast to ex­ist­ing white cab­i­nets and fit­tings. Or sim­ply add some black stools and a new black tap. This can be enough to cre­ate a stylish con­trast that will give your kitchen a mod­ern facelift.”

High drama The com­bi­na­tion of black gloss, glass, tim­ber fin­ishes and tiles in this Ikea kitchen is strik­ing.

SIL­VER STEM Ar­cisan 1260 black kitchen mixer, $349, from Har­vey Nor­man. Over and above

A con­trast­ing bench­top and light put the fo­cus on the workspace. LONG BLACK

In­nova “Nau­tica” square­neck kitchen mixer in Black, $209, from Bath­ware Di­rect. IN THE DARK Oliv­eri Pi­etra top­mount sink, $831, from Ap­pli­ances On­line. WHITE LINES Mo­saic Ru­bix black gloss tiles, $98 a sq m, from Beau­mont Tiles.

Shine on

Soften the look with stain­less steel, tim­ber and a band of white tiles.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.