SHADY CHAR­AC­TERS

Look­ing for the right shade op­tion for your out­door space? In­te­rior de­sign ex­pert James Tre­ble has you cov­ered…

Homes+ (Australia) - - NEWS -

Pre­pare your ex­te­ri­ors for the hot sum­mer sun with the new shade so­lu­tions.

THE NOT-SO-HUM­BLE UM­BRELLA

A sim­ple um­brella is an “oldie but a goodie” be­cause it gives you shade in an in­stant – and there’s one for every bud­get. The stan­dard um­brella with a cen­tre pole is for­ever be­ing reimag­ined in a host of new colours and pat­terns, so it’s easy to find one that suits your style. Can­tilevered um­brel­las, which have a pole to one side, don’t take up space in the cen­tre of your ta­ble and are made in much larger sizes. If it works for your gar­den, con­sider a wall-mounted um­brella with a swing arm, so you can ad­just the area that gets shaded through­out the day.

Ben Shanley, out­door liv­ing buyer for Bun­nings, says um­brel­las are an easy and por­ta­ble op­tion. “Newer mod­els have more flex­i­bil­ity to ad­just di­rec­tion and height, and al­low you to max­imise your sun pro­tec­tion,” he says. Pre­mium can­tilever um­brel­las of­fer heavy duty bases with re­tractable wheels. “This lets you fol­low the sun around your back­yard or eas­ily store your um­brella away when not in use,” he says.

GAR­DEN-FRIENDLY GAZE­BOS

With the op­tion of add-on walls and awnings, many of the lat­est gaze­bos en­able you to cre­ate a com­plete out­door room. And in­creas­ingly more have the ap­pear­ance of a per­ma­nent struc­ture, yet can be erected or dis­man­tled in min­utes. “The but­ter­fly style gazebo is a pop­u­lar de­sign, as it al­lows all-weather cover,” says Ben Shanley. “In­no­va­tive de­signs in­clude ad­justable roof pan­els that can be ro­tated or re­tracted to cre­ate shade at any time of the day.”

CLEVER AWNINGS

Awnings pro­vide a smart way of block­ing out di­rect sun­light and cre­at­ing shade out­side your home. Ba­si­cally, they ex­tend the eaves of the home, re­mov­ing the ef­fect of di­rect sun­light from above. This con­trib­utes to heat re­duc­tion in­side the home, which can lessen the need for home cool­ing and so re­duce en­ergy bills.

Awnings come in var­i­ous con­fig­u­ra­tions. Pop­u­lar for decks and bal­conies are fold­ing arm awnings (that ex­tend out­wards) and straight drop awnings. Large man­u­ally or elec­tron­i­cally op­er­ated awnings work ex­tremely well for al­fresco ar­eas and over ve­ran­das or bal­conies, and come in a wide range of stylish colours made from sun-tough, UV-sta­ble fab­rics. You can choose from con­trast­ing or com­ple­men­tary colours that work with the ex­te­rior of your home or add a lovely and in­stant hol­i­day vibe with clas­sic and strik­ing colour­ful stripes.

Jenny Brown, na­tional mar­ket­ing man­ager for Lux­aflex win­dow fash­ions, says the beauty of a fold­ing arm awning is its in­cred­i­ble en­ergy ef­fi­ciency. “You can keep the heat off the win­dows in sum­mer, and then re­tract the awning dur­ing the win­ter months when you need the heat of the sun,” she says. And while many peo­ple con­sider fold­ing arm awnings old-fash­ioned, the lat­est fab­rics make them mod­ern. “Many of the new fab­rics are Aus­tralian-made and de­signed to co-or­di­nate with Du­lux and Color­bond,” Jenny says.

Straight drop awnings are also a great op­tion for out­door spa­ces like pa­tios and bal­conies. Po­si­tioned be­tween col­umns or posts on a ter­race or bal­cony, they can be eas­ily and quickly dropped down when the sun gets too strong.

SIM­PLE SHADE CLOTH SAILS

Shade cloth sails are a cost-ef­fec­tive and adapt­able way to add shade to your out­door ar­eas. Sail cloth can be cut and stretched into var­i­ous shapes and in­stalled over a range of lo­ca­tions like decks, court­yards and ter­races, with­out the time or cost in­volved in en­gi­neer­ing and con­struct­ing con­ven­tional solid struc­tures such as per­go­las or solid roof ad­di­tions. In­stal­la­tion is easy, via thin non-ob­tru­sive poles, and of­ten com­bined with con­nec­tion points at­tached to the home. The sails don’t in­ter­rupt nat­u­ral air­flow or ob­scure views and can be over­lapped to cover large or awk­ward shaped ar­eas.

TREND­ING NOW

Jenny Brown says there’s a move to­wards dark, plain coloured fab­rics and mo­tori­sa­tion. “With the ad­vent of smart tech­nol­ogy it’s now pos­si­ble to op­er­ate both in­ter­nal blinds and straight drop Evo awnings with the touch of a but­ton on a Peb­ble re­mote, or even through your smart­phone or tablet de­vice,” she says. Lux­aflex’s Pow­erView mo­tori­sa­tion also al­lows you to set scenes which op­er­ate au­to­mat­i­cally. “So for the hottest part of the day, you can en­sure blinds and awnings are in the op­ti­mum po­si­tion, even if you’re not home,” she says.

Ap­plaro gazebo, 300cm x 300cm x 275cm, $349, from Ikea.

1. Regis can­tilever um­brella in Kiwi, from $1045, from Shade Aus­tralia. 2. Mi­mosa An­daman can­tilever um­brella in Sand, 3.5m, $549, from Bun­nings. 3. Beachkit hula thatch pa­tio um­brella, 230cm, from $229.95, from Shade Aus­tralia. 4. Jun­gle Canopy beach um­brella, $249, from Sun­day Sup­ply Co.

Como fold­ing arm awning from Lux­aflex.

Evo straight drop awning and Peb­ble re­mote from Lux­aflex.

Up the wall Ikea’s Flisö para­sol, $29.99, and Bram­sön base, $35, have a flat edge so they fit neatly into tight spa­ces.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.