Main­tain a di­etary bal­ance

Isis Town and Country - - News - By LEANNE SHORTER

ADDING is bet­ter than sub­tract­ing.

As a per­sonal trainer, I am al­ways talk­ing to peo­ple about their ex­er­cise and eat­ing habits. Peo­ple are al­ways keen to tell me about their diet and what they are and are not eat­ing.

I com­mend peo­ple when it comes to willpower and com­mit­ment, but I have to tell you that I am not that good at stick­ing to all the rules and reg­u­la­tions of cer­tain “di­ets” out there.

In fact, I don’t even try them, be­cause I know that long-term, they are not sus­tain­able. I need to be able to be con­sis­tent to stay healthy and fit.

I be­lieve that de­priv­ing your­self of foods and drinks that you love will only lead to binge eat­ing and drink­ing, or at least over-in­dulging in th­ese ar­eas. Our bod­ies are pretty amaz­ing and we were meant to eat a whole range of foods. We need car­bo­hy­drates for en­ergy, pro­tein for growth and mus­cle health, fats for our cells, and vi­ta­mins and min­er­als for all-over body well­ness.

Elim­i­nat­ing or se­verely re­duc­ing any of th­ese will re­sult in a nu­tri­tional im­bal­ance. I also be­lieve that we were given teeth to chew – so drink­ing meal re­place­ments isn’t nat­u­ral or healthy. One of the best ways to eat healthily is con­cen­trat­ing on what you can add to your diet, rather than what you need to take away. If you are eat­ing more of the “good stuff”, then you won’t have the need or de­sire for the “bad stuff”.

There are cer­tain groups out there that be­lieve eat­ing too much fruit or starchy veg­eta­bles can make you fat. I to­tally dis­agree.

In all the years I have been a trainer, I have never had some­one come to me to lose weight be­cause they ate too much wa­ter­melon, or sweet corn or ba­nanas.

Trust me, it is not th­ese things that make you fat.

Cut­ting out foods that are high in nat­u­ral sug­ars can be bad for our brains. Our brains need those sug­ars to func­tion at their best.

So rather than try to cut

Leanne Shorter I need to be able to be con­sis­tent to stay healthy

out all the bad things and fol­low too many rules, try adding more healthy foods, fruits, veg­eta­bles, nuts and seeds and drink more wa­ter.

Leanne Shorter is a reg­is­tered per­sonal trainer with Fit­ness Australia. You can con­tact her at www.re­sis­tit­bands.com.

PHOTO: MAX FLEET

HEALTHY EAT­ING: Leanne Shorter be­lieves you should think about what you can add to your diet, not sub­tract.

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