Quick­Type word sug­ges­tions

Mac Format - - IMPROVE | IOS -

Be­ing able to write any­thing from short text mes­sages to long doc­u­ments on an iPhone can be lib­er­at­ing, but the small key­board does come with risks. Per­haps you’re fa­mil­iar with the web­site Damn You Auto Cor­rect… If you find your­self typ­ing slowly to avoid such em­bar­rass­ing sit­u­a­tions, Quick­Type may re­store your con­fi­dence and speed.

Quick­Type is Ap­ple’s take on pre­dic­tive text. Above the key­board, a bar dis­plays up to three words or phrases it thinks you might type next. Th­ese are re-eval­u­ated with each character you type. Ap­ple says that Quick­Type learns from your pre­vi­ous con­ver­sa­tions and writ­ing style, the app you’re us­ing and, in apps like Mail and Mes­sages, who you’re com­mu­ni­cat­ing with. Sug­ges­tions should be more for­mal when you’re mes­sag­ing a col­league about a meet­ing, and ca­sual when re­ply­ing to a friend’s invitation to meet up. It’s even smart enough to of­fer likely an­swers when you’re asked a ques­tion.

To free up space, you can hide sug­ges­tions by swip­ing down from one. Swipe up from the thin bar that re­sults to get sug­ges­tions back. Quick­Type can also be dis­abled in Set­tings > Gen­eral > Key­board > Pre­dic­tive. Alan Stone­bridge

Ap­ple says that Quick­Type learns from your pre­vi­ous con­ver­sa­tions and writ­ing style

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