Bear Ne­ces­si­ties Why the fu­ture of watches is black and white – and cud­dly.

Bam­boo­zle your wrist with a “panda dial” time­piece

Men's Health (Australia) - - Contents -

Pan­das are known as the world’s most glob­ally diplo­matic an­i­mals due to be­ing si­mul­ta­ne­ously black, white and Asian. The “panda dial” watch holds a sim­i­larly broad ap­peal.

Tra­di­tion­ally, the name refers to a white watch face with black chrono­graph sub di­als. Con­versely, a re­verse panda dial fea­tures a dark face and light sub di­als. Be­yond the eye-catch­ing looks, the con­trast dial of­fers a prac­ti­cal edge by de­liv­er­ing height­ened leg­i­bil­ity.

Pop­u­lar in the 1960s, panda di­als are once again in the spot­light fol­low­ing the sale at auction last year of Paul New­man’s 1968 Rolex Day­tona. His vin­tage panda even­tu­ally went for a record-break­ing $US17.75 mil­lion, mak­ing it the most ex­pen­sive wrist­watch ever sold. Pan­de­mo­nium in­deed.

PHO­TOG­RA­PHY BY PHILIP LE MASURIER

1/ OMEGA Speed­mas­ter Rac­ing Co-ax­ial Chrono­graph $5650 2/ Ray­mond Weil Free­lancer Chrono­graph $4999 3/ Rado Dia­mas­ter $4000 4/ Alpina Star­timer Pi­lot $1675 5/ Gi­rard Per­re­gaux Lau­re­ato Chrono­graph $20,550 6/ TAG Heuer Au­tavia Cal­i­bre Heuer 02 $6850

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