WESTERN STYLE

PAR­RA­MATTA’S FACELIFT CON­TIN­UES WITH THE OPEN­ING OF HUSK & VINE KITCHEN AND BAR.

Men's Style (Australia) - - Priority Male -

In the geo­graphic heart of Syd­ney, Par­ra­matta is forecast to grow in pop­u­la­tion by 40 per cent to 2013. Which is why the city – fre­quently planned for sub­stan­tial re­de­vel­op­ment over the years with­out any­thing ac­tu­ally hap­pen­ing – is now un­der a trans­for­ma­tion, with coun­cil un­der­tak­ing a multi-bil­lion dol­lar re­vi­tal­i­sa­tion of the city cen­tre.

One of the fore­run­ners of the new Par­ra­matta is a just opened precinct that in­cludes the five-star SKYE Ho­tel Suites and the Husk & Vine Kitchen and Bar by SITE Hos­pi­tal­ity. Fly­ing Fish’s Stephen Seck­old heads the new food of­fer­ing at the venue on the premises of the for­mer Wheat­sheaf Ho­tel. A public dis­play show­cases the re­mains of an 1840s con­vict hut, Wheel­wright’s work­shop and the cel­lar of the Wheat­sheaf that were all dis­cov­ered dur­ing ex­ca­va­tion of the site.

Seck­old will re­flect the Mediter­ranean and Mid­dle East­ern cul­tural in­flu­ences of Par­ra­matta and sur­rounds in the menu, the kitchen cen­tred around a cus­tom Beech oven where Head Chef Ash­ley Bren­nan will pro­duce flat­breads and pi­des, as well as roasts, large cuts of meat and whole birds for guests to share, such as whole lamb shoul­ders with harissa, okra and chick­pea stew.

The drinks list will fo­cus on bou­tique winer­ies, fea­tur­ing small pro­duc­ers from Aus­tralia and abroad - with a con­cen­tra­tion on Aus­tralian cool cli­mate wines, as well as French and Ital­ian clas­sics.

Fi­nally, Par­ra­matta is grow­ing up… and here’s the proof.

Husk & Vine Kitchen and Bar Open from 6.30am to late, 7 days a week; 7/45 Mac­quarie Street, Par­ra­matta, Syd­ney. Ph: (02) 7803 2323.

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