Five truths of the sleep-de­prived

Mother & Baby (Australia) - - Sanity Saver -

1. EVEN A RE­FORMED PARTY GIRL CAN’T HAN­DLE THIS EX­HAUS­TION

“Main­tain a good blood-sugar level by avoid­ing a gap of more than four hours be­tween meals, so you don’t get a drop in en­ergy,” says nu­tri­tion­ist Penny Crowther. “Eat pro­tein reg­u­larly dur­ing the day. Women should aim for 60g daily but it’s ben­e­fi­cial to eat a lit­tle more when you’re sleep de­prived. Two medium eggs or a small tub of cot­tage cheese pro­vides 20g of pro­tein.”

2. WHEN FRIENDS WITH­OUT CHIL­DREN TALK ABOUT BE­ING TIRED YOU LAUGH DARKLY

“Af­ter hav­ing a child, your life changes for­ever,” says Emma. “Some­times it can be hard to see things from the per­spec­tive of your friends with­out chil­dren. But try to re­mem­ber that you once felt tired from the pres­sures of a de­mand­ing job and a so­cial life. Prob­a­bly not as tired, though.”

3. YOU HAVE NO CLUE WHAT YOU USED TO DO ON THE WEEK­END

“It’s nor­mal to long for the days when you could laze around with the Sun­day pa­pers,” says Emma. “But life has a dif­fer­ent fo­cus now. Luck­ily, ba­bies are quite par­tial to lunch and a stroll.”

4. LOW­ER­ING A SLEEP­ING BABY INTO HIS COT WITH­OUT WAK­ING HIM IS AN EX­PERT SKILL

“Try and get into the habit of putting baby down sleepy, but not fully asleep, so that he learns to set­tle him­self,” says Tina.

5. WHEN YOUR BABY FI­NALLY DRIFTS OFF, YOU MISS HIM

“It’s nor­mal to miss your baby when he is asleep, as he is cen­tral to your thoughts," says Emma. “You have a chance to con­tem­plate the depth of your feel­ings for him. But try to en­joy pre­cious time to your­self – and rest!”

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