THE KIND­EST CUTS AR­BORIST SAYS PRUN­ING OF­TEN AN­SWER

Mt Druitt - St Mary's Standard (East) - - TRADES+SERVICES - Cas­san­dra Briedis For de­tails, go to: aussi­etreeser­vices.com.au

CEN­TRAL Coast ar­borist Dane Pick­er­ing is one of many lo­cals still clean­ing up the dam­age from the ‘su­per­storm’ that caused wide­spread de­struc­tion across NSW in April.

Founder of Aussie Tree Ser­vices, he and his team have been work­ing non-stop to re­move branches, clear de­bris from roofs and re­pair cracked trees.

“To­day is our 38th day in a row,” Mr Pick­er­ing said.

“It’s cre­ated an in­flux in work which is pos­i­tive but from my per­spec­tive as an eth­i­cal ar­borist, it’s not good for the en­vi­ron­ment with the loss of trees.”

He said many res­i­dents have adopted a “knee-jerk re­ac­tion” that trees are danger­ous, call­ing for large trees around their home to be re­moved.

“We need to be look­ing af­ter and main­tain­ing trees rather than cut­ting them down,” he said. “I try to ex­plain to the cus­tomer the benefits of trees and why it might not be nec­es­sary to re­move it.”

Trees with ma­jor struc­tural faults should be cut down but Mr Pick­er­ing said it’s of­ten a sim­ple case of prun­ing. “Keep an eye out for any sig­nif­i­cant changes – look out for dead­wood, un­nec­es­sary mush­rooms or bracket fun­gus,” he said.

Pic­ture: MARK SCOTT

Founder of Aussie Tree Ser­vices, Dane Pick­er­ing prun­ing a tree at The En­trance, Cen­tral Coast.

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