GREENER GRASS

GET TO WORK IN WIN­TER TO ACHIEVE A STUN­NING PATCH IN SUM­MER

Mt Druitt - St Mary's Standard (East) - - LIFESTYLE - Janita Singh

WIN­TER may give the res­i­dent “green­keeper” some respite from cut­ting the lawn, but that doesn’t mean the mower should go into stor­age.

While grass grows much slower, it can’t be ig­nored, Gareth Tay­lor, of Rover Aus­tralia, says.

“Make sure you mow your lawn based on the height of the grass and not by the cal­en­dar year,’’ Tay­lor says.

Tay­lor has these tips to main­tain your win­ter lawn: NOT TOO MUCH OFF THE TOP: En­sure that you’re not cut­ting grass too low as this can weaken the root sys­tem and al­low for more weeds and dis­eases to take hold. Try to keep the grass be­tween 5-7cm tall; any lower and you could de­prive the grass blades of the abil­ity to cre­ate energy from the sun, which your lawn needs to grow. AVOID PATCHES: It is in­evitable that cer­tain patches of the lawn will be­gin to brown and die due to cold and less sun ex­po­sure. As the warm sea­son grass be­comes dor­mant, use a colder sea­son va­ri­ety like rye­grass to fill patches. Ap­ply your seeds, add a thin layer of top soil and keep moist to en­cour­age growth. When the warm months ar­rive, the warm weather grass will grow over the colder grass and form a seam­less lawn once again. LET IT BREATHE: Aer­ate your soil with small holes to al­low soil and roots to ab­sorb air, wa­ter and other nu­tri­ents. Sim­ply use a gar­den fork or, if you have larger lawn, rent a spiked lawn roller. CHANGE LANES: Don’t mow your lawn in the same di­rec­tion ev­ery time – grass grows in the di­rec­tion in which it has been mowed, so for an even, up­right lawn, make sure you mix it up. KEEP IT CLEAR: While it may be tempt­ing to leave the gor­geous au­tumn leaves on the grass, they suf­fo­cate the lawn and starve the grass of valu­able sun­light. Put dis­carded leaves and lawn trim­mings to good use by re­cy­cling them back into the gar­den in the form of mulch or a com­post, which pro­vides valu­able nu­tri­ents to help en­rich soil.

A striped mas­ter­piece like this can be easily achieved in your own backyard.

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