AC­TIV­ITY WEAVES WAY TO THE FORE

TECH­NIQUE BE­COMES ON TREND

Mt Druitt - St Mary's Standard (East) - - HOME - Laura Tri­este See more of Wil­liams’ work at the­unusu­al­pear.com MT DRUITT-ST MARYS STAN­DARD, Wed­nes­day, Fe­bru­ary 24, 2016

THOSE in the know with the lat­est in DIY trends may have no­ticed that the old craft tech­nique of weav­ing is hav­ing a re­vival.

For­tu­nately, you no longer need a lot of time and a ma­chine big­ger than you to learn how to weave your way to mak­ing a colour­ful wall hang­ing or stylish scarf.

Tal­ented weaver and de­signer Rainie Wil­liams from The Un­usual Pair will be show­ing how it is done as a guest speaker at Syd­ney’s Stitches and Craft Show in March.

“I will be do­ing demon­stra­tions through­out the day and I will have lim­ited things for sale,” she says.

Wil­liams says small rec­tan­gu­lar and round looms can be eas­ily used to hand weave many items.

“My mini-sized looms are about the size of an A5 page and you can pretty much get weav­ing done in about an hour or so,” she says.

“You can make wall hang­ings, coast­ers or place­mats and you can make patches and turn them into larger scale projects, like scarfs and blan­kets.

“Wall hang­ings are def­i­nitely the most pop­u­lar at the mo­ment. They are all over web­sites like Pin­ter­est and In­sta­gram.”

With a few tools, some yarn and the mas­ter­ing of a few sim­ple tech- niques, Wil­liams says peo­ple can quickly mas­ter the art of hand weav­ing.

“It’s got a real med­i­ta­tive na­ture to it and it’s a good way to keep your hands busy,” she says.

“Once you get the hang of things, it’s re­ally easy to start weav­ing or­gan­i­cally be­cause it just comes nat­u­rally to you.

“Once you start, you won’t be able to put it down.”

Rainie Wil­liams will show some sim­ple weav­ing tech­niques at the Stitches and Craft Show at Rose­hill Gar­dens Race­course from March 3 to 6.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.