NEUE SE­LECTS

Broached Com­mis­sions.

Neue Luxury - - Front Page -

Woody Allen was once quoted as say­ing that “you can live to be a hun­dred if you give up all the things that make you want to live to be a hun­dred.” And while some may sub­scribe to such a con­trite and tor­tu­ous re­nun­ci­a­tion, our ed­i­to­rial team isn’t par­tic­u­larly en­am­oured with the thought of out­liv­ing a gi­ant Aldabra tor­toise. Which is why we took time out to speak with Lou Weis, Cre­ative Direc­tor of Broached Com­mis­sions about which of his arte­facts and ob­jects would in­evitably lead us all to a hap­pier, al­beit shorter life!

BROACHED EAST CHI­NA­MAN’S FILE ROCK­ING CHAIR. DE­SIGNED BY TRENT JANSEN

Of the three founding Broached de­sign­ers, Trent Jansen is the most adept in nar­ra­tive based de­sign. He can­not start de­sign­ing un­til he knows the hu­man story, as was the case with this Rock­ing Chair. Start­ing with the dis­cov­ery that an over­whelm­ing num­ber of Chi­nese mi­grants in the Aus­tralian gold fields were men, Trent de­cided to cre­ate a ma­chine that moved in the same way as a child strapped to a mother’s back; a me­chan­i­cal ver­sion of the ma­ter­nal em­brace for tired, exploited Chi­nese prospec­tors.

BROACHED COLO­NIAL BIRDSMOUTH MAST. DE­SIGNED BY ADAM GOODRUM

In The Fatal Shore, Robert Hughes wrote that the tim­ber for masts and flax for sails were re­spon­si­ble for main­tain­ing and ex­pand­ing the colo­nial em­pires, much like ura­nium and pe­tro­leum do to­day. In this ta­ble, a birdsmouth mast is re­duced to an or­na­men­tal like el­e­ment that punc­tures the ta­ble top. Cre­ated as a Chi­nese Chip­pen­dale style ta­ble, the piece re­flected the pass­ing of the colo­nial em­pires by re­duc­ing the main tool of their power to a del­i­cate de­tail.

BROACHED EAST PALLUDARIUM SHIGELU. DE­SIGNED BY AZUMA MAKOTO

Aus­tralia’s love for Ja­panese de­sign started in the mid 19th cen­tury, dur­ing the Meiji Restora­tion. That first wave of mid­dle class con­sump­tion has never re­ally abated, with Ja­pan still ex­port­ing its ex­oti­cism and Aus­tralian’s con­sum­ing it en masse. The Broached East Palludarium Shigelu com­mis­sion for Azuma Makoto fo­cused on the trans­porta­tion of ex­otic plants by draw­ing in­spi­ra­tion from the War­dian case, a pro­tec­tive con­tainer which trans­ported im­ported plants with­out ever ex­pos­ing them to the sea air.

BROACHED PI­ANO CREDENZA. DE­SIGNED BY ADAM GOODRUM

Des­ley Lus­combe, Dean of De­sign at the Uni­ver­sity of Tech­nol­ogy, Syd­ney, had one ob­ject from her child­hood that she cher­ished above all else; a Ger­man man­u­fac­tured up­right pi­ano from the late 19th cen­tury. Hav­ing long stopped play­ing the in­stru­ment, the up­right pi­ano proved to be far too ob­tuse to serve any or­na­men­tal pur­pose. In re­design­ing and re­pur­pos­ing the piece as a credenza, Adam Goodrum used every part of the orig­i­nal, thereby ex­tend­ing the sen­ti­men­tal re­la­tion­ship be­tween the arte­fact and its owner. The Broached Pi­ano Credenza pur­pose­fully re­cy­cled ma­te­ri­als and es­tab­lished a new life in an old love.

BROACHED HO­TEL HO­TEL COUCH. DE­SIGNED BY CHARLES WIL­SON

Broached Ho­tel Ho­tel was the third col­lab­o­ra­tion with cu­ra­tor John Mcphee, who in this in­stance guided de­sign­ers in a fo­cused re­sponse to the works of Wal­ter Bur­ley Griffins. Charles was in­spired by Bur­ley Griffins’ façade de­signs for the cre­ation of this struc­tural and dec­o­ra­tive couch arm. Made from solid cast brass, the pat­tern also talks di­rectly to the ge­ome­tries used by Lucy Mcrae for the fea­ture wall at the ho­tel’s re­cep­tion desk.

BROACHED COLO­NIAL TALL BOY. DE­SIGNED BY CHARLES WIL­SON

There is no Broached de­signer more un­com­fort­able with a nar­ra­tive based de­sign ap­proach than Charles Wil­son. Any ini­tial trep­i­da­tion and anx­i­ety how­ever is al­ways over­come by his re­mark­able ca­pac­ity to syn­the­size a range of his­tor­i­cal de­sign in­flu­ences into a new ob­ject that emerges di­rectly from his ex­pe­ri­ence with Aus­tralian in­dus­try and de­sign. The Tall Boy brings to­gether a love for the makeshift agri­cul­tural struc­tures of ru­ral Aus­tralia, the slen­der lines of Bie­der­meier fur­ni­ture and the sim­plic­ity of obelisks to cre­ate a unique ob­ject. Wil­son proves that re­sis­tance is of­ten a great start­ing point to a new cre­ative path. Launched in 2011, the Tall Boy re­mains a pop­u­lar ob­ject for Broached Com­mis­sion.

BROACHED HO­TEL HO­TEL FEA­TURE WALL. DE­SIGNED BY LUCY MCRAE

Ho­tel re­cep­tions are one of the few static spa­ces in a broader jour­ney of dis­cov­ery. In re­sponse to this, the Broached Ho­tel Ho­tel fea­ture wall em­bed­ded a pas­sive frac­tal an­i­ma­tion for ho­tel guests to gaze into whilst wait­ing to check in or out. Lucy Mcrae, a young mas­ter of re-en­gi­neer­ing the body, was an ob­vi­ous choice for the com­mis­sion. Mcrae’s de­sign re­flects the dec­o­ra­tive win­dows and light fix­tures seen in Bur­ley Griffins’ iconic build­ings such as The Capi­tol The­atre in Melbourne.

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