02 shoot in poor con­di­tio Ns

Blue skies are bor­ing – learn to love the days when there’s some drama in the clouds

NPhoto - - Special Feature -

You can take fan­tas­tic land­scape pho­to­graphs any­where if the weather is do­ing in­ter­est­ing things

Dan Bal­lard, Land­scape pho­tog­ra­pher

Work­ing hand in hand with look­ing for good light is the idea of shoot­ing in ad­verse weather con­di­tions. While most of the world thinks of a day with clear blue skies as ideal, pho­tog­ra­phers feel ex­actly the op­po­site. A clear day is one of the worst out­looks I can see in the fore­cast when on a photo trip – days of end­less rain and over­cast skies may be the ac­tual worst, but noth­ing but blue is not far be­hind.

Ideal con­di­tions ex­ist some­where in be­tween the two, such as when a storm is mov­ing in or out, or when there are nu­mer­ous clouds but plenty of blue can still be seen. When con­di­tions are bad (good for pho­tog­ra­phy) you al­ways want to be out shoot­ing. Even if you live in a less-than-stun­ning area, you can take fan­tas­tic land­scape pho­to­graphs any­where if the weather is do­ing in­ter­est­ing things.

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