06 CRE­ATE MOVE­MENT

Turn view­ers into par­tic­i­pants through the use of leading lines

NPhoto - - Special Feature -

The amount of eye move­ment through an im­age is some­thing that I con­sider a great in­di­ca­tor of how in­ter­est­ing and suc­cess­ful a photo is. An im­age with a great amount of move­ment holds the viewer’s at­ten­tion, caus­ing them to spend more time look­ing at it. It makes the pic­ture more mem­o­rable to them.

One of the best ways to cre­ate move­ment within a pho­to­graph is to use leading lines. Leading lines pull the eye into the scene and, if used cor­rectly, move the gaze around the scene. They can also be used to lead the eye from one sub­ject to an­other. You could look for clear phys­i­cal lines such as paths, rows of trees or crops, or rivers and canals, and lines within the struc­tures of build­ings (ver­ti­cal col­umns or hor­i­zon­tal bands of win­dows are ob­vi­ous ex­am­ples of this). How­ever, even a vari­ance in colour within an ob­ject can form leading lines within an im­age.

An­other way you can cre­ate move­ment in your shots is through the way the main sub­jects are ar­ranged. The amount of space be­tween the two (or three) main el­e­ments in the scene af­fects how the eye moves around the im­age. If the el­e­ments are placed close to­gether, ei­ther side by side or di­rectly above one an­other, there is very lit­tle move­ment as the viewer can look at them as a block. If the main sub­jects are placed at op­po­site cor­ners of the scene, how­ever, the viewer’s eye must travel all the way across the frame when look­ing from one to the other. This cre­ates move­ment and there­fore makes the photo more in­ter­est­ing to them.

An im­age with a great amount of move­ment holds the viewer’s at­ten­tion, caus­ing them to spend more time look­ing at it Dan Bal­lard, Land­scape pho­tog­ra­pher

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