Freeze fall­ing rain

Claire Gillo makes it in­doors and pops some flash to get in­tense re­sults

NPhoto - - Contents -

Cap­ture the mo­ment rain hits a flower us­ing a flash synced to your shut­ter speed

In a mo­ment the spray of water drops in our pic­ture is gone – but what our eyes fail to see in that split sec­ond, our cam­era can cap­ture. Nor­mally, you’d use your Nikon’s shut­ter speed set­ting to freeze a mov­ing sub­ject, but there may be times when you won’t be able to set a fast enough shut­ter speed, or the am­bi­ent light may not al­low you to pro­duce the best pos­si­ble re­sult. When this is the case, an ex­ter­nal flash­gun will come to the res­cue.

Ev­ery D-SLR has a flash sync shut­ter speed set­ting. You can’t use a faster shut­ter speed than this be­cause at higher shut­ter speeds the sen­sor is ex­posed through a mov­ing slit rather than all at once, so the flash would only ap­pear in part of the pic­ture. Most Nikon D-SLRs will sync at 1/250 sec or slower.

There will be times when you won’t be able to set a fast enough shut­ter speed to freeze ac­tion… When this is the case, an ex­ter­nal flash­gun will come to the res­cue

In this tu­to­rial we’re go­ing to show you how to sync your flash and cap­ture water drops be­ing dis­persed over a flower. As our main sub­ject we’ve se­lected a bright orange ger­bera, and we sug­gest you use some­thing sim­i­lar. Against the dark back­drop the bright colour pops out. To cre­ate our rain we used a spray bot­tle to pro­duce the fine drops fil­ter­ing over the flower. To make the drops of water ‘ping’ we back­lit the setup. This es­sen­tially means we’re light­ing our sub­ject from be­hind, which in turn cre­ates a halo ef­fect around the edge of our sub­ject.

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