Tam­ing your pooch

Penrith Press - - NEWS -

DOGS be­hav­ing badly of­ten re­sult in red-faced own­ers scur­ry­ing for the clos­est exit point or place to hide – but there is help at hand.

Dog trainer Luana Os­mani, from Pets Train­ing & Board­ing, says there is no magic wand to im­prove your dog’s man­ners but un­der­stand­ing the trig­gers is im­por­tant.

“Bad man­ners can be de­scribed as any an­noy­ing or un­pleas­ant be­hav­iour,” she says.

“This can be any­thing from jump­ing on guests, bark­ing at strange dogs and pulling on the lead.

“Com­monly it will be cer­tain trig­gers that will cause a dog to be­have badly, cou­pled with a lack of knowledge on how to pre­vent the prob­lem.”

For own­ers deal­ing with ex­ces­sive bark­ing, she rec­om­mends en­rich­ing your dog’s en­vi­ron­ment with bore­dom busters like treat balls, or giv­ing your dog a daily chal­lenge and ex­er­cis­ing them ad­e­quately.

To curb jump­ing she says it’s best not to make a fuss when you ar­rive home – just ig­nore your dog un­til they are quiet.

“When guests come over, pop a leash on your dog and ask them to ‘sit’ and ‘stay’ and re­ward good, calm be­hav­iour. Ask your guests to only praise your dog when they are calm,” she says.

Bad be­hav­iour is stress­ful for both own­ers and their dogs: “When you un­der­stand why your dog is be­hav­ing the way they are, you … be­gin to im­prove the bond you both share,” Os­mani says. “Once you start work­ing along­side your dog you will both reap the re­wards of a lov­ing re­la­tion­ship, with­out the stress.”

She says a well-be­haved dog is a happy dog and that is good for their brains and gen­eral well­be­ing.

Luana Os­mani with minia­ture schnauzers Bobo and Puipui.

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