RAIDERS OF THE BRO­KEN PLANET

If it is broke, do fix it…

PlayStation Official Magazine (UK) - - CONTENTS - @Sa­muelHorti

Love to mess things up for peo­ple? This third-per­son co-op shooter gives you the chance to do just that. In it, you and three friends (or in­ter­net ran­doms) blast through story-driven mis­sions. Its sig­na­ture move is let­ting an­other player in­vade those games to make it more dif­fi­cult for the heroes to com­plete their ob­jec­tives. It’s an in­ter­est­ing idea that works well at times but is ul­ti­mately wasted on a game that is full of flaws. Let’s start with the pos­i­tives. Raiders looks bright and colour­ful. It has a sticky cover me­chanic that makes it easy to move about its lev­els. Its cast of over-the-top char­ac­ters have var­ied play styles, from a sniper whose gun charges as he aims to a nim­ble Aussie with fast-fir­ing shot­guns. And its take on melee com­bat is re­fresh­ing, with a rock, pa­per, scis­sors sys­tem in which you can either grap­ple, strike, or dodge an op­po­nent.

The game throws a lot of ene­mies at you, and when all four play­ers are backed into a cor­ner, re­ly­ing on each other, it can be a fran­tic ride. But those mo­ments are rare, and the good bits are ru­ined by poor de­sign choices. Take its asym­met­ric co-op, which al­lows one ‘an­tag­o­nist’ to join the hordes of squishies. For the first two or three games it’s fun to an­noy the other play­ers, tak­ing pot­shots and bash­ing their brains in, but it gets old fast. The an­tag­o­nists come from the same pool as the reg­u­lar classes and have the same abil­i­ties, so you never re­ally feel like you’re see­ing a dif­fer­ent side of the game.

MISSION: REPET­I­TIVE

Its big­gest fault is its crim­i­nally unimag­i­na­tive mis­sions. Each one is multi-stage with var­i­ous lo­ca­tions and ob­jec­tive types, be that escorting an NPC or blow­ing up gun­ships. It’d work well if those ob­jec­tives weren’t so repet­i­tive. The sec­ond mission, for ex­am­ple, tasks you with killing ene­mies to help over­load strange mon­u­ments with en­ergy. That’s fine, but once you’ve com­pleted the first mon­u­ment a sec­ond, stronger one pops up. And when you’ve busted that one, an even larger one springs up. It’s plain dull.

At the mo­ment there’s one four-mission cam­paign avail­able for £9.99, and more will un­lock in the com­ing months. But if they’re any­thing like this one, I can’t see any rea­son to go back. Add a sprin­kling of per­for­mance is­sues — I rarely found a game with­out at least a touch of lag — and Raiders is a let­down. The sil­ver lin­ing is that its two pro­logue mis­sions are free to try, so if any­thing about it tick­les your fancy you may as well give it a bash. Just don’t ex­pect to fall in love with it.

VERDICT

“FOR THE FIRST TWO OR THREE MIS­SIONS, IT’S FUN TO AN­NOY THE OTHER PLAY­ERS.”

At its best, Raiders of­fers fran­tic co-op shoot­ing against waves of ene­mies. But bor­ing mis­sions and repet­i­tive ob­jec­tives mean it’s ul­ti­mately medi­ocre. Sa­muel Horti

Raiders’ an­tag­o­nist mode, which lets you in­vade a four-man co-op game, is its best idea.

INFO

FOR­MAT PS4 ETA OUT NOW PUB MERCURYSTEAM DEV MERCURYSTEAM

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