HOW TO MAKE YOUR ROOM ‘FEM­I­NINE’

Dar­ren Palmer shares his tips, plus copies of his new book

QT Magazine - - HOME & GARDEN -

DAR­REN Palmer from The Block has shared some tips from his new book ‘Home Space’ with QT Mag read­ers. See the com­pe­ti­tion page in this is­sue for a chance to win one of three copies of his new book packed with ideas for your home.

Dar­ren has shared his tips how to make a room more fem­i­nine.

This fem­i­nine look may be play­ing to gen­der stereo­types and, of course, there are any num­ber of women who would like this or hate its uber-pink pret­ti­ness.

The exercise is to demon­strate how di­a­met­ri­cally dif­fer­ent you can make a room look with the change of art­work, soft fur­nish­ings, dé­cor, flow­ers and oc­ca­sional fur­ni­ture.

Firstly, the scale of the oc­ca­sional fur­ni­ture has been changed; the sideta­bles and lamps are about 80 per cent smaller than in the mas­cu­line look.

This makes the sofa and cof­fee ta­ble look larger and the room cosier.

The art­work also has a fem­i­nine look, with the pinks and pur­ples work­ing in with the pas­tel colour scheme. The two art­works fill the wall just as well as the mir­ror in the mas­cu­line look; the idea is that, if placed above a sofa, what­ever is on the walls should be con­tained within the width of the sofa with ap­prox­i­mately 100 mm on ei­ther side from the edge of the frame to the edge of the sofa arm.

This pair of art­works are the right size for the space and for the sofa. One of these pic­tures, as lovely as they are,

would not be enough for this par­tic­u­lar wall.

The rug is again the base from which to build the room – here, it’s bright and am­bi­ent in pat­tern. Var­i­ous coloured or neu­tral rugs could have worked, but this bold state­ment is a great way of show­ing how dif­fer­ent a room can be by chang­ing a few key in­clu­sions.

The cush­ions are all linen to match the linen sofa, and in two sizes and colours – a lum­bar size darker pink and a square, 50 by 50 cm light pink. They skate the line between colour co­or­di­na­tion and matchy-matchy. I think it’s on the right side of that line, but it’s a close call. Pinks are also found in the metallics used for in­ter­est in this scheme; where gold was used in the mas­cu­line scheme, here we have cop­per.

A cop­per bowl adds height and in­ter­est to the cof­fee ta­ble, and ties in with both the round, mir­rored tray sit­ting un­der the flo­ral ar­range­ment and the mir­rored sideta­bles. The mir­rored tray also re­flects the colour of the flow­ers and gives a pool-like sense of depth to the cof­fee ta­ble.

Bright red na­tives light up the room and tie in with the art­works.

Again, there’s a fine line between match­ing ev­ery el­e­ment in the room and be­ing in­formed by el­e­ments to cre­ate a scheme, but I think it works. In terms of show­ing off a dif­fer­ent look us­ing the same ba­sic in­clu­sions, I think we’ve nailed the brief. This is an ex­tract from Homes­pace by Dar­ren Palmer (Mur­doch Books) RRP $39.99 avail­able now from all good book stores and on­line. WIN A COPY – see the en­try form in this is­sue of QT Mag­a­zine!

This fem­i­nine look may be play­ing to gen­der stereo­types and, of course, there are any num­ber of women who would like this or hate its uber-pink pret­ti­ness.

Author and ex­pert ren­o­va­tor Dar­ren Palmer.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.