NO.1 ON THIS DAY

We take a trip back in time to see what was sit­ting on top of the Aussie charts this day through the years. How many can you sing at a Karaoke Night?

QT Magazine - - RETRO -

2014: SHAKE IT OFF - TAY­LOR SWIFT

It’s hard not to tap your feet to this gem from Tay­lor Swift. Con­firm­ing she had truly left her coun­try days be­hind her and was now the Queen of Pop, Shake it Off was a mas­sive hit all over the world. Not only was it the 22nd song to de­but at No.1 in the US, it earned Swift three Grammy awards, and sat on top of the Aussie charts on this day 2 years ago and sold 490,000 units. The song caused con­tro­versy when it was not nom­i­nated in the JJJ Hot 100 de­spite a push across the na­tion by an­gry Tay Tay fans.

2011: SOME­BODY THAT I USED TO KNOW - GOTYE

Writ­ten by Belgian/Aus­tralian artist Gotye and fea­tur­ing Kiwi singer/gui­tarist Kim­bra, this song was one of the most suc­cess­ful Aussie hits since Men At Work in the 1980s. Com­mer­cially, "Some­body That I Used to Know" is Gotye's most suc­cess­ful re­lease, top­ping charts in the US, UK and Aus­tralia, as well as 23 other na­tional charts, plus reach­ing the top 10 in more than 30 coun­tries around the world. The song has sold more than 13 mil­lion copies world­wide, be­com­ing one of the best-sell­ing dig­i­tal sin­gles of all time. The video for the sin­gle has had over 803 mil­lion views on You Tube and re­mains one of the most fas­ci­nat­ing mu­sic videos in a long time. PS – you didn’t have to cut me off.

1992 AMI­GOS PARA SIEM­PRE – JOSE CAR­RERAS AND SARAH BRIGHT­MAN

Writ­ten for the clos­ing cer­e­mony of the 1992 Barcelona Olympic Games by Andrew Lloyd Web­ber and Don Black, Ami­gos Para Siem­pre means ‘Friends for Life’ and is per­formed in English, Span­ish and Cata­lan. Per­formed by Jose Car­reras and Web­ber’s ex-wife Sarah Bright­man, it was the favourite song of Juan An­to­nio Sa­ma­ranch, the man who fa­mously said “…and the winner is Syd-o-nee”, in his role as pres­i­dent of the In­ter­na­tional Olympic Com­mit­tee from 1980 to 200. It was played at his funeral in Barcelona in April 2010. It was one of two songs for the games, the other be­ing ‘Barcelona’ per­formed by Fred­die Mercury and Mon­ser­rat Ca­balle.

1981 JESSIE’S GIRL – RICK SPRING­FIELD

Jessie is a friend. Yeah, I know he’s been good friend of mine. But lately some­thing's changed, it ain't hard to de­fine. Jessie's got him­self a girl and I want to make her mine. Hang on Rick, that’s not what mates do to mates. Rick Spring­field has been singing that open­ing verse for over thirty years now and it still makes mid­dle aged women (and men) get up and dance at ev­ery 80’s con­cert he plays across the globe. Taken from the al­bum Work­ing Class Dog, this was a slow burner of a song, tak­ing 19 weeks on the US charges to reach No.1, one of the slow­est climbs of all time and stayed on top of the charts for just one week. Iron­i­cally, it was Spring­field’s only num­ber one song. The 66 year old from Guild­ford in NSW is also an ac­tor, with roles in the soap Gen­eral Hos­pi­tal and the pi­lot for Bat­tlestar Galac­tica, plus a role along­side Meryl Street in ‘Ricki & The Flash’.

1975 FOX ON THE RUN – THE SWEET

Num­ber one on the Aussie charts 31 years ago to­day, Fox On The Run was The Sweet’s first sin­gle that was writ­ten by the band, rather than by their pro­duc­ers. The lyrics re­fer to groupies, as ‘Fox’ was a pop­u­lar term at the time for an at­trac­tive woman. The Sweet hit the UK scene in 1968, and had their last hit in 1978. Only two mem­bers sur­vive to­day, both who per­form around the world in their own ver­sion of ‘The Sweet’. Brian Con­nolly died at age 51 af­ter sev­eral heart at­tacks brought on by chronic al­co­holism in the 70s and 80s, while drum­mer Mick Tucker was just 54 when he died of Leukaemia in 2002. The band is best re­mem­bered for their hit Ball­room Blitz, along with Fox On The Run.

1969 IN THE GHETTO - ELVIS PRES­LEY

Recorded in the first stu­dio ses­sion af­ter his amaz­ing 1968 Come­back Spe­cial, Elvis Pres­ley also recorded the clas­sics Sus­pi­cious Minds, Ken­tucky Rain, and Don't Cry Daddy dur­ing the same pe­riod in the Mem­phis stu­dio. Writ­ten by Mac Davis, it is a sad tale about a cy­cle of poverty re­peat­ing it­self. The song was Pres­ley's first Top 10 hit in the US in four years, peak­ing at num­ber 3, and his first UK Top 10 hit in three years, peak­ing at No. 2. It sat at No.1 on the Aussie charts this day 47 years ago. Cov­ered by nu­mer­ous acts since, it was re­leased by a band in 1984, their first sin­gle. That band was Nick Cave & The Bad Seeds.

1965 HELP! - THE BEA­TLES

Re­leased when the world was in the grip of Beatle­ma­nia, Help! was the ti­tle song for the movie of the same name and the sound­track to go with it. Writ­ten by John Len­non, The Bea­tles recorded "Help!" in 12 takes on 13 April 1965 us­ing four-track equip­ment. The documentary se­ries The Bea­tles An­thol­ogy re­vealed that Len­non wrote the lyrics of the song to ex­press his stress af­ter the Bea­tles' quick rise to suc­cess. "I was fat and de­pressed and I was cry­ing out for 'Help'," Len­non told Play­boy. The Bea­tles stopped play­ing live con­certs just 12 months later.

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