AN EX­PERT GUIDE TO FAIL-PROOF MENSWEAR

QT Magazine - - FASHION -

ASIMPLE pair of fit­ted chi­nos, a grey T-shirt and some cologne can go a long way. Ip­swich menswear de­signer Nikke Hor­ri­gan has been in the men’s fash­ion game long enough to know how to dress to im­press and he says it’s not as com­pli­cated as most men think. Nikke’s la­bel, aptly called Nikke Hor­ri­gan, has been the young de­signer’s love af­fair for the past few years and re­flects his motto for fail-proof dress­ing: keep it sim­ple. His dis­tressed denim, frayed hem­lines and min­i­mal­ist, re­laxed aes­thetic is on par with the evo­lu­tion of men’s fash­ion. “Men’s fash­ion has re­ally lifted its game. So­cial me­dia and fash­ion am­bas­sadors have re­ally pushed men’s fash­ion in the right di­rec­tion,” he said. “A few years ago, when so­cial me­dia didn’t ex­ist, men weren’t as in­clined to go shop­ping or talk so much about fash­ion, but now its a celebrity thing – what’s hot and what’s not. “I think that’s a great thing and men’s fash­ion will grow. It might not ever be as big as women’s fash­ion but it will be on par some­where down the track.” Nikke said the Ip­swich fash­ion scene had a lot to learn from its neigh­bour­ing cap­i­tal cities. “Fash­ion in Ip­swich doesn’t re­ally ex­ist and that was why it was hard to start, given the fact that

A few years ago when so­cial me­dia didn’t ex­ist, men weren’t as in­clined to go shop­ping or talk so much about fash­ion but now its a celebrity thing - what’s hot and what’s not ... I think that’s a great thing and men’s fash­ion will grow.

be­ing a pretty small place, peo­ple are blue col­lar and it’s not that built around fash­ion. It’s just the town it is,” he said. “It’s an old min­ing town and brought up in that tra­di­tional way, you went to work and they’re all hard-work­ing peo­ple and don’t take fash­ion se­ri­ously, they think it’s a bit friv­o­lous. “There are changes hap­pen­ing and ev­ery­one has sort of jumped on this band­wagon, which I think is good, it brings ev­ery­one to­gether but I think it’s still a is am­bi­tion­s­grow­ing­fair here “Ip­swich­way but up, and­off I will don’tI to have­big where al­ways­think wings.a lot I I’ll­beof think Ip­swich­fondmy stay.it home mem­o­riesshouldI have­was and good­big be. my but to fam­i­lythereme comesHe saida time the when ten­dency you for need mento jumpto re­ject the fash­ion pad­dock.” was put down to stigma – a men­tal­ity that was due for an over­haul. “It def­i­nitely comes down to stigma, a lot of guys have been brought up like that. Their dads taught them to get on the tools, they never said ‘do you want to go to the shops and get a new pair of jeans’, that was never in the con­text,” he said. The boil­er­maker turned plumber turned navy air­craft tech­ni­cian turned coalminer turned fash­ion de­signer said he al­ways knew there was “an­other side” in fash­ion de­sign­ing he had never shown. “Both my par­ents were trendy. My dad was a smooth crim­i­nal, he had turtle­necks and I saw him like James Bond, and my mother was the same,” he said. “I had that up­bring­ing where fash­ion was kind of a big deal, it was a state­ment and that has fol­lowed me. “There is no bet­ter feel­ing than know­ing you’re at your pur­pose. In fash­ion I found my pur­pose.”

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