Cannabis fires at ran­dom

Science Illustrated - - CANNABIS -

The ac­tive in­gre­di­ent in cannabis, THC, binds to two dif­fer­ent re­cep­tors, which ex­ist al­most ev­ery­where in the body.

THC AF­FECTS THE BRAIN'S CB1 RE­CEP­TORS IN:

The basal gan­glia, which con­trol our mo­tions and steer our co­or­di­na­tion.

The amyg­dala, which re­acts by curb­ing fear re­ac­tions – also to things which we know to be dan­ger­ous.

The hip­pocam­pus, a cen­tre of mem­ory, which be­comes poorer at stor­ing mem­o­ries.

THC CHANGES BODYCB2 RE­CEP­TORS IN:

The im­mune sys­tem, where the white blood cells be­come less ac­tive. Sub­se­quently, cannabis could be ef­fi­cient against chronic in­flam­ma­tion, etc.

The heart, which beats faster in the short term. How­ever, cannabis could re­duce both car­diac rhythm and blood pres­sure in the long run.

The in­testines, whose rhyth­mi­cal mo­tions are re­duced, im­prov­ing a per­son's ap­petite.

The bones, whose health and heal­ing are al­tered.

The cere­bral cor­tex, which reg­u­lates im­por­tant neu­ro­trans­mit­ters such as dopamine, sero­tonin, and no­ra­drenaline.

The spinal cord, which curbs pain nerve sig­nals to the brain, caus­ing pa­tients to feel less pain.

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