AND TALK­ING OF DINO DIS­COV­ER­IES ...

Science Illustrated - - SCIENCE UPDATE -

TICKS FEASTED ON DI­NOSAUR BLOOD

Like hu­mans, the huge pre­his­toric crea­tures had to put up with blood-suck­ing ticks. Palaeon­tol­o­gists from the Ox­ford Univer­sity Museum of Nat­u­ral His­tory in Eng­land have found 99-mil­lion-year-old lumps of am­ber in­clud­ing ticks. In one of the lumps, the tick is stuck on a di­nosaur feather.

HER­BI­VORES CON­SUMED CRUS­TACEANS

Some her­bi­vores found it dif­fi­cult to re­main veg­e­tar­i­ans. A new anal­y­sis of fos­silised di­nosaur ex­cre­ments has re­vealed re­mains of crus­taceans. Ac­cord­ing to palaeon­tol­o­gists, egg-lay­ing, plant-eat­ing, pre­his­toric be­he­moths might have eaten the crus­taceans as a pro­tein source dur­ing the mat­ing sea­son.

DI­NOSAUR FLEW LIKE A WOOD­PECKER

Chi­nese sci­en­tists have com­pared the wings of a 126-mil­lion-year-old fos­sil to mod­ern birds. The study shows that the crea­ture flew like small birds such as wood­peck­ers. It flapped its wings rapidly, fold­ing them along its body and dart­ing through the air like a mis­sile.

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