It’s time to bring space back to the small screen, says Richard Ed­wards

SFX: The Sci-Fi and Fantasy Magazine - - Letters -

Guardians Of The Galaxy has just be­come the big­gest film of the year. To put that in per­spec­tive, a movie based on a lit­tle­known comic about a tree man, a talk­ing rac­coon and a guy ob­sessed with an audio cas­sette has made more money than new Trans­form­ers, X- Men and Cap­tain Amer­ica out­ings. Even tak­ing into ac­count that Mar­vel could strike box of­fice gold with pretty much any­thing at the mo­ment ( yes, even a cigarsmok­ing duck), this wouldn’t have hap­pened if cin­ema­go­ers didn’t re­ally like go­ing into space.

It’s been three years now since the can­cel­la­tion of Star­gate Uni­verse marked the end of over 20 years of un­in­ter­rupted space­ship ad­ven­tures on TV – th­ese days only the en­tirely CG Star Wars Rebels ( see page 127) and Novem­ber’s Syfy minis­eries As­cen­sion ( page 12) are fly­ing the flag. It’s easy to see why net­works fell out of love – de­spite the en­dur­ing pop­u­lar­ity of Star Trek and love for the re­booted Bat­tlestar Galac­tica, space was per­ceived as a niche sub- genre loved only by geeks. But surely Guardians and co have changed that, and shown that life among the stars can ap­peal to the masses – and given the pop­u­lar­ity of a weekly trip

Su­per­notu­ral

I no­ticed in is­sue 252’ s TV Pre­view that you in­cluded Su­per­nat­u­ral sea­son 10. What has hap­pened to sea­son 9? There was a time when we had caught up with the States ( nearly) but some of us are still wait­ing to find out what hap­pens at the end of sea­son 8.

Ann Hod­nett, email Why is Su­per­nat­u­ral treated so badly here in the UK? About to start sea­son 10 in Amer­ica, yet ITV dropped it after a few sea­sons. Then Liv­ing picked it up, rushed through a se­ries, and now it seems they can’t be both­ered with it.

Robert Gra­ham, Lin­coln Sky Liv­ing has cer­tainly up­set fans by drop­ping the show, but re­joice – the re­gion 2 DVD of sea­son nine hits UK shelves on 20 Oc­to­ber. Hope­fully that’s some small con­so­la­tion. to Wes­teros, ven­tur­ing out into strange new worlds of a more in­ter­plan­e­tary per­sua­sion can’t be too much of a stretch.

Right now the par­al­lels with the late ’ 70s are ob­vi­ous, when the uni­verse- chang­ing suc­cess of Star Wars prompted a brief dal­liance with the orig­i­nal BSG and Buck Rogers In The 25th Cen­tury. The dif­fer­ence now, how­ever, is that with mod­ern visual ef­fects and genre- lit­er­ate, geek- savvy showrun­ners, there’s a very real pos­si­bil­ity new shows could ac­tu­ally be good.

Life among the stars can ap­peal to the masses

And there’s no limit to what se­ries set in space could do – they don’t just have to be another it­er­a­tion of Star Trek. Star­ship shows could be fun, dra­matic, ad­ven­ture- filled… the only limit is the imag­i­na­tion of the writ­ers.

It took long enough for comic book he­roes to bring their movie suc­cess to TV with the likes of Ar­row and an abun­dance of new shows start­ing over the next year. Hope­fully TV net­works will be slightly quicker em­brac­ing a whole­sale re­turn to outer space.

“Some of us can han­dle mas­sive talk­ing trees”

cos­tumeitis that seems to be spread­ing. Hawk­eye’s suit was not the pur­ple I was hop­ing for, and they must have been un­der some con­trac­tual obli­ga­tion to show the ac­tor’s face as well be­cause he never wears his iconic mask/ cowl ei­ther. I ac­tu­ally think this is also why Guardians was such a big hit, colour and ac­tion aside; they aren’t afraid to show a non- hu­man side to their char­ac­ters. Some of us can han­dle mas­sive talk­ing trees or wise- cracking rac­coons.

Peter Gil­bert, The Mid­lands Does this mean you pre­fer Bat­man in clas­sic plum and li­lac? Are Hulk’s bright ma­genta jorts due a come­back? More pur­ple might be a so­lu­tion to drab su­pers, but it’s prob­a­bly not the right one.

What bet­ter TV star than the Star Lord him­self?

“Even Net­flix UK doesn’t want us, guys. What gives?”

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