NINA FOR­EVER

The Blaine Broth­ers dis­cuss their gory and funny new mé­nage à trois…

SFX: The Sci-Fi and Fantasy Magazine - - Red Alert -

IT WAS A LONG TIME COM­ING

Nina For­ever is di­rected by the Blaine broth­ers, Ben and Chris – the award­win­ning sib­lings who were be­hind a host of com­edy shorts, in­clud­ing 2006’ s Hallo Panda. The broth­ers’ undead fea­ture de­but is about to land on DVD and Blu- ray, so the big ques­tion is: why did it take so long to make? “For ages we had this dis­con­nect be­tween our short come­dies and our fea­ture film scripts,” ex­plains Chris. “Peo­ple would say, ‘ I re­ally like your short, what is it you want to do as a fea­ture?’ ‘ Well, it’s this re­ally se­ri­ous thing about the bank­ing cri­sis…’ They weren’t nec­es­sar­ily bit­ing!”

AFTER LAUGH­TER COMES TEARS

Although it’s be­ing billed as a com­edy, Nina For­ever deals with some weighty sub­jects – no­tably grief and de­pres­sion. The film sees Rob ( Cian Barry), a su­per­mar­ket drone, be­gin dat­ing co- worker Holly ( Abi­gail Hard­ing­ham). This is a big deal, given Rob lost his pre­vi­ous girl­friend Nina ( Fiona O’Shaughnessy) in a car ac­ci­dent, and we’re first in­tro­duced to him as he tries to com­mit sui­cide. The guy de­serves a break, but ev­ery time he and Holly try to have sex, Nina’s bloody, bro­ken revenant ap­pears in the bed, ques­tion­ing what he thinks he’s do­ing. “One of the things we like about the stuff we write is it’s al­ways a lit­tle strange,” chuck­les Ben. “So we re­ally wanted to do some­thing that was us.”

THERE’S BLOOD AND SEX

With that de­scrip­tion in mind, it’s per­haps no sur­prise that the film

fea­tures enough sex and gore to please even the keen­est Game Of Thrones fan. “It was com­pletely or­ganic,” says Ben. “Ob­vi­ously you don’t make a film in which beau­ti­ful peo­ple are naked and not think, ‘ Well, at least some­body’s go­ing to en­joy watch­ing this!’ But that wasn’t why that hap­pened.”

IT’S BEEN A HIT ON THE FES­TI­VAL CIR­CUIT

In­flu­enced by films as di­verse as Let The Right One In and The Wrestler – height­ened re­la­tion­ship dra­mas set in hum­drum en­vi­ron­ments – the gore is re­ally just a vis­ual metaphor for the char­ac­ters’ psy­cho­log­i­cal messi­ness. Con­se­quently, the Blaines were con­cerned about how it might be re­ceived by fan­dom. “We were wor­ried about show­ing it to hor­ror fans as it doesn’t fol­low the rules,” says Chris. “It’s not about be­ing scared.” De­spite that, the film went down a treat at fes­ti­vals such as Fan­ta­sia in Mon­treal and FrightFest in Lon­don.

SHE’S DEAD AND ( NOT) LOV­ING IT

“Nina isn’t a monster,” says Chris of the film’s undead third wheel – “I’m not an ex,” she stresses at one point, in­sist­ing that her death “doesn’t mean we’re on a break”. It’s a bril­liant, star- mak­ing turn by Fiona O’Shaughnessy – pre­vi­ously best known for play­ing Jes­sica Hyde in Utopia – who man­ages to make Nina sym­pa­thetic de­spite be­ing, well, a zom­bie. “She’s of­ten the op­po­si­tion in a scene, but you never go, ‘ Oh god, here she comes…,’ says Chris. “You’re of­ten on her side.”

Nina For­ever is out on DVD/ Blu- ray on 22 Feb.

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