CANADA

AWARD-WIN­NING AD­VEN­TURE SPORT PHO­TOG­RA­PHER JODY MAC­DON­ALD EX­PLORES THE PLANET’S WILDEST COR­NERS FOR NA­TIONAL GEO­GRAPHIC, BBC, PATAG­O­NIA AND RED BULL. THE ONE PLACE SHE WON’T BE IS FOL­LOW­ING IN ANY­ONE ELSE’S FOOT­STEPS.

SHIBUI Issue - - CONTENTS - JODYMACDONALDPHOTOGRAPHY.COM IN­STA­GRAM.COM/JODYMACDONALDPHOTO

Na­tional Geo­graphic pho­tog­ra­pher Jody Mac­Don­ald shares some un­for­get­table mo­ments from life as an ad­ven­ture trav­eller.

WHERE ARE YOU FROM ORIG­I­NALLY AND WHERE ARE YOU BASED NOW?

I am orig­i­nally from Van­cou­ver Canada and I now live in Sun Val­ley, Idaho in the United States.

WHAT CAM­ERA DO YOU USU­ALLY SHOOT WITH?

I shoot with the Canon IDX for sport pho­tog­ra­phy and the Le­ica M and X-U for ev­ery­thing else. I use the Canon for the high frame rate and the Le­ica cam­eras for the aes­thetic that they pro­duce.

WHAT CAME FIRST, THE AD­VEN­TURE SPORT OR PHO­TOG­RA­PHY, AND HOW DID THAT LEAD TO YOUR DECADE­LONG CA­REER ON A 60 FOOT CATA­MA­RAN?

In uni­ver­sity I ma­jored in Out­door Re­cre­ation so ad­ven­ture sports was some­thing I was al­ways in­ter­ested in. I took pho­tog­ra­phy as an elec­tive in uni­ver­sity and fell in love with it as a cre­ative medium. I de­cided to bring my cam­era with me on my out­door ad­ven­tures so it was a great mar­riage of both my pas­sions.

CAN YOU TELL US A LIT­TLE ABOUT THE PROJECTS YOU’RE WORK­ING ON AT THE MO­MENT?

I’m cur­rently work­ing on a project for Le­ica in Pa­pua New Guinea and have just started with Sea Legacy. I will be work­ing on projects that help bring aware­ness to ocean is­sues in the hope of it get­ting more pro­tec­tion. Those projects will be on­go­ing. I will also be work­ing on a project for Na­tional Geo­graphic Travel this year.

FROM YOUR IM­AGES AND TRAVEL DES­TI­NA­TIONS, YOU WOULD AP­PEAR TO HAVE A DREAM JOB! WHAT’S YOUR FAVOURITE MEM­ORY – AN AB­SO­LUTE ‘WOW’ MO­MENT?

That is a tough ques­tion. One of the best mem­o­ries I have from trav­el­ling was one time when we had sailed across the Mozam­bique chan­nel and found a pris­tine 20 mile sand dune on an un­in­hab­ited is­land. We were so ex­cited to fly (paraglide) the mas­sive dunes. We man­aged to get through the shore beach break with our dinghy while our boat was an­chored around the cor­ner in the calm bay be­hind us. We ended up fly­ing all day and in the late af­ter­noon from the air one of us spot­ted our dinghy washed up on the beach. The dinghy an­chor chain had bro­ken and the dinghy went through the beach break and had washed ashore. The tide was high and we knew we wouldn’t be able to do any­thing about it so we just kept fly­ing un­til sun­set. When we landed, we checked the dam­age on the dinghy and knew we would have to wait un­til low tide the next morn­ing to try to get off the is­land.

We had no water left and didn’t bring any food with us so we ended up sleep­ing in our paraglid­ing wings. The next morn­ing we couldn’t get the dinghy mo­tor started so we de­cided to keep fly­ing. That af­ter­noon we man­aged to get it run­ning and made it through the shore break and back to our boat. It was one of the best ex­pe­ri­ences I think any us of have had. Here is a cap­tion I wrote for one of the im­ages from that ex­pe­ri­ence:

"It was 2010 and the 4th year of our world kite­board­ing ex­pe­di­tion by cata­ma­ran and my 7th straight year at sea. Things were too dicey around So­ma­lia to go up through

the Red Sea so from Mada­gas­car we changed the plan to go around Cape Hope in­stead. We sailed across to Mozam­bique and made our first stop in the Bazaruto ar­chi­pel­ago, off the south­ern coast. Upon reach­ing land the largest sand dune I'd ever seen pre­sented it­self to us. No one had ever flown it be­fore. No hel­met, no shoes and sand as far as the eye could see. We de­stroyed our dinghy, we got ma­rooned overnight, we had to sleep in our wings and it was mag­i­cal.”

CAN YOU TELL US A LIT­TLE ABOUT YOUR FAVOURITE DESTI­NA­TION TO PHO­TO­GRAPH?

Like many pho­tog­ra­phers, one of my favourite des­ti­na­tions to pho­to­graph is In­dia. It is such a geo­graphic and cul­tural won­der. There is so much to pho­to­graph at every turn. It’s al­most over­whelm­ing and with such a di­verse geo­graph­i­cal land­scape you can al­most find any kind of geo­graph­i­cal ex­pe­ri­ence you could be look­ing for… from deserts to the Hi­malayas and ev­ery­thing in be­tween, In­dia has it all.

TOP PHO­TOG­RA­PHY TIP FOR BE­GIN­NERS?

When you are tak­ing pho­to­graphs don’t just think about the sub­ject, try to think about the whole pic­ture. What is in the back­ground and how is that adding or sub­tract­ing from the pho­to­graph. Try to place the sub­ject within that back­ground so that they com­pli­ment each other. This will help your im­ages have more depth and tell a bet­ter story.

WHAT’S YOUR TOP TRAVEL TIP?

Trust your in­stincts and al­ways carry toi­let paper ;)

IS IT PEO­PLE OR AN­I­MALS WHICH MOST FASCINATE YOU WHEN PHO­TOGRAPH­ING THEM?

I like both but my favourite is when they are in­ter­est­ing. The an­i­mals which I love to pho­to­graph are the ones that are very in­tel­li­gent and I have amaz­ing in­ter­ac­tions with.

I also love pho­tograph­ing unique, in­ter­est­ing peo­ple... it just de­pends on the sit­u­a­tion.

WHAT WAS YOUR FIRST PHO­TOG­RA­PHY AWARD? WAS THERE ONE WHICH RE­ALLY MEANT A GREAT DEAL IN PAR­TIC­U­LAR?

My first pho­tog­ra­phy award was I think for PDN (Photo District News). It was a pho­to­graph that I took of Rajan the ele­phant walk­ing in the trees in In­dia. The award that has meant the most to me was win­ning the Red Bull

Il­lume be­cause it’s the best of the best in the ad­ven­ture sport pho­tog­ra­phy world so the com­pe­ti­tion is ex­tremely dif­fi­cult. Win­ning that was very much an hon­our.

ON ONE OF YOUR IN­STA­GRAMS YOU’VE WRIT­TEN “ONE OF THOSE MO­MENTS WHEN YOU LOOK UP AND THE PHO­TO­GRAPH JUST RE­VEALS IT­SELF TO YOU.” DO YOU FIND THAT’S THE WAY YOU GET YOUR BEST SHOTS OR IS THERE A LOT OF WORK BE­HIND THE SCENES GET­TING THE LIGHT­ING, FRAME, COM­PO­SI­TION, ETC RIGHT?

Get­ting good pho­to­graphs is hard work. Yes, the ma­jor­ity of the time you are analysing the light, com­po­si­tion, tim­ing, etc… some­times you get lucky and things just align, but you do have to be pay­ing at­ten­tion so that you can cap­ture that mo­ment when it does hap­pen.

WHAT’S NEXT FOR YOU?

I will con­tinue to work on projects for Sea Legacy, Na­tional Geo­graphic

and var­i­ous per­sonal projects. I just got back from Pa­pua New Guinea and will def­i­nitely go back there in the new year as well as In­dia. The world is a big, beau­ti­ful place, there is so much to do and so lit­tle time!

“LIKE MANY PHO­TOG­RA­PHERS, ONE OF MY FAVOURITE DES­TI­NA­TIONS TO PHO­TO­GRAPH IS IN­DIA. IT IS SUCH A GEO­GRAPHIC AND CUL­TURAL WON­DER. THERE IS SO MUCH TO PHO­TO­GRAPH AT EVERY TURN. ”JODY MAC­DON­ALD

PRE­VI­OUS PAGE Rajan was the last ele­phant to sur­vive from 10 that were taught to swim for log­ging in the An­daman Is­lands, be­tween In­dia and Myan­mar. The ele­phants car­ried the logged trees from the is­lands to nearby boats. LEFT Mau­ri­ta­nia.

CLOCK­WISE FROM BE­LOW Mau­ri­ta­nia; Panama; Mau­ri­ta­nia.

LEFT TO RIGHT Palau; Rajan with his care­taker of 30 years, Nazroo. Rajan died in 2016.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.