BALI

SHIBUI Issue - - CONTENTS - CU­RA­TOR BRI­SEIS ONFRAY MAKER NI KETUT MINIASIH (BALI ECO STAY LAND OWNER’S WIFE) IN­TER­VIEW JOHNNY BLUND­STONE (OWNER OF BALI ECO STAY) PHO­TOS NINA TROMP COUN­TRY IN­DONE­SIA

A favourite desti­na­tion the world over. Just don’t step on a Canang Sari.

BALI IS A FAVOURITE TRAVEL DESTI­NA­TION FOR TRAV­ELLERS NEAR AND FAR. FONDLY KNOWN FOR ITS STUN­NING SCENERY, HAPPY BA­LI­NESE CHARM AND COLOUR­FUL HINDU CER­E­MONIES. JUST DON'T STEP ON A CANANG SARI.

GALUNGAN IS THE MOST DEC­O­RA­TIVE TIME OF YEAR IN BALI, WITH PENJOR DEC­O­RA­TIONS MASTED AT THE FRONT OF EVERY HINDU HOUSE. WHEN IS THIS HOL­I­DAY AND WHAT DOES GALUNGAN REP­RE­SENT TO THE BA­LI­NESE PEO­PLE?

Galungan Day oc­curs every six months in the Ba­li­nese cal­en­dar

(210 days). Galungan is a Ba­li­nese hol­i­day cel­e­brat­ing the vic­tory of Dharma (cos­mic law and or­der) over

Ad­harma (dig­nity and re­spect). It marks the time when the an­ces­tral spir­its visit the Earth.

WHAT MA­TE­RI­ALS ARE THEY MADE FROM? AND, ARE THEY ETH­I­CALLY SOURCED FROM DES­IG­NATED PLAN­TA­TIONS?

The cer­e­mo­nial dec­o­ra­tions are made from bam­boo, co­conut and palm leaves, and colour­ing. The ma­te­ri­als are all taken from fam­ily gar­dens or bought in a tra­di­tional, lo­cal mar­ket.

WHO MAKES THESE INTRICATE PENJOR STREET DEC­O­RA­TIONS?

Ev­ery­one can make the Penjor.

Usu­ally the women make the dec­o­ra­tions for the Penjor and the men col­lect the bam­boo and leaves and then set the dec­o­ra­tion to the bam­boo stem.

DO ALL HINDU FAM­I­LIES PAR­TIC­I­PATE TO MAKE DEC­O­RA­TIONS AND OF­FER­INGS? WHO ARE THE TRA­DI­TIONAL ARTISANS OF THE FAM­ILY AND WHO TEACHES THIS CRAFT IN THE COM­MU­NITY?

Yes. It is cus­tom­ary to our tra­di­tion and be­lief to par­tic­i­pate. It is a spir­i­tual and com­mu­nity cel­e­bra­tion. The women or par­ents of a fam­ily are the artisans and they are the teach­ers for the com­mu­nity to con­tinue to cel­e­brate and pass on this tra­di­tion.

TRI HITA KARANA: HAR­MONY AMONG PEO­PLE. HAR­MONY WITH NA­TURE OR EN­VI­RON­MENT. HAR­MONY GOD.” WITH

HOW SYM­BOLIC ARE THE LIT­TLE, WO­VEN BAS­KET OF­FER­INGS TO THE BA­LI­NESE PEO­PLE? THEY ARE SPRIN­KLED EV­ERY­WHERE YOU WALK.

The of­fer­ings are made to please the good spir­its and ap­pease the bad. They are called Canang Sari – (daily of­fer­ings). They are a sym­bol of thank­ful­ness to the Hindu God,

Ida Sang Hyang Widhi Wasa. It is of­fered every day as a way to show grat­i­tude for the peace given to the world.

WHERE DOES THE COLOUR AND DE­SIGN IN­FLU­ENCE COME FROM WHEN MAK­ING CER­E­MO­NIAL DEC­O­RA­TIONS AND OF­FER­INGS?

Ba­li­nese avoid dark or black cloth­ing as the colour is of­ten as­so­ci­ated with black magic, evil spir­its and peace dis­tur­bance. In con­trast, white is be­lieved to be the colour for the peace­ful spirit. Yel­low (or golden yel­low) is also a favourite as it rep­re­sents God Wisnu, the pre­server of the Uni­verse.

WHERE CAN A VIS­I­TOR GO LEARN THE ART OF BA­LI­NESE DEC­O­RA­TIVE AND BAS­KET WEAV­ING?

Any vil­lage ar­ti­san will be happy to teach the art form. We also of­fer these work­shops for guests on re­quest.

DO YOU HAVE ANY WORK­SHOPS COM­ING UP IN 2018?

Yes, work­shops are of­fered to guests all year round.

HAVE YOU ANY LO­CAL’S TIP FOR VISI­TORS TO BALI?

Be pa­tient and don’t show out­ward anger or frus­tra­tion and you will have a won­der­ful time.

CLOCK­WISE FROM LEFT Penjor dec­o­ra­tions are masted at the front of every Hindu house dur­ing Galungan; tra­di­tional Ba­li­nese weav­ing and cer­e­mo­nial dec­o­ra­tion work­shops are avail­able for guests; Bali Eco Stay; tra­di­tional ar­ti­san weav­ing work­shop.

FROM LEFT TO ABOVE Ni Ketut Miniasih teaches cer­e­mo­nial dec­o­ra­tion work­shops at Bali Eco Stay; the lush prop­erty set­ting of Bali Eco Stay.

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