An ea­gle eye for the in­vis­i­ble

F0RENSIC OF­FI­CER GOES WHERE THE NAKED EYE CAN’T

Southern Gazette (South Perth) - - Kensington South East Metro - Su­sanne Reilly

FOREN­SICS of­fi­cer Chan­tal Uren knows very well the im­por­tance small and some­times in­vis­i­ble ev­i­dence can have to a po­lice in­ves­ti­ga­tion.

The First Class Con­sta­ble is a South East Met­ro­pol­i­tan Dis­trict Foren­sic In­ves­ti­ga­tions Of­fi­cer and has been work­ing in foren­sics for the past four years.

A ‘nor­mal’ day for Const. Uren could in­clude vis­it­ing up to five scenes to col­lect and process foren­sic in­for­ma­tion.

She said her role in­volved iden­ti­fy­ing ev­i­dence that could link an of­fender to a scene.

“This in­cludes fin­ger­print­ing, col­lec­tion of DNA and other ex­hibits and pho­tog­ra­phy,” she said.

“Once an of­fender has been pro­cessed and charged for an of­fence, I am also re­quired to at­tend court to give ev­i­dence re­gard­ing my ex­am­i­na­tion.”

She said she at­tended bur­glary and as­sault scenes, dam­age, rob­beries, traf­fic in­ci­dents and armed hold-ups.

“After attendance we cre­ate a re­port that out­lines the ex­am­i­na­tion that was con­ducted,” she said.

Const. Uren said work­ing in foren­sics gave her the best op­por­tu­nity to make a dif­fer­ence to the com­mu­nity by find­ing ev­i­dence where no other lines of in­quiry may ex­ist.

“I also get to help vic­tims of crime who can be in a vul­ner­a­ble state. It is ex­tremely re­ward­ing to try to make peo­ple feel more at ease,” she said.

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