OF­FICE PARTY A CHORE: SUR­VEY

Southern Gazette (South Perth) - - Business -

SUR­VEY re­sults have shown more than 60 per cent of employees would pre­fer to scrap their work Christ­mas party in favour of re­ceiv­ing money.

Ac­cord­ing to the mar­ket re­search con­ducted by First Class Ac­counts, the sur­vey also found 50 per cent of par­tic­i­pants did not enjoy at­tend­ing their work­place Christ­mas party, with a fur­ther 14 per cent ad­mit­ting they did not at­tend at all.

Owner of First Class Ac­counts Vic­to­ria Park Stella Ting said the find­ings of the re­search sug­gested peo­ple were so­cially ex­hausted dur­ing the fes­tive sea­son, making a staff Christ­mas party feel like an­other chore.

“The lead-up to Christ­mas is a very busy time; many peo­ple have lots of so­cial ac­tiv­i­ties in the cal­en­dar,” Ms Ting said.

“Many busi­ness op­er­a­tors be­lieve you must have a Christ­mas party for the sake of staff morale, but as our sur­vey sug­gests, this is not nec­es­sar­ily the case.”

Busi­ness op­er­a­tors could con­sider al­ter­na­tives such as bonuses, gifts or time off in lieu of an of­fice Christ­mas party.

Ac­cord­ing to Ms Ting, one of the most tax­ef­fi­cient ways to spread Christ­mas cheer among the work­force was to pro­vide staff with gift vouch­ers. “Gift vouch­ers are tax-de­ductible as long as they are un­der $300, and they give staff a de­gree of choice over how they spend their money,” she said.

“De­spite good in­ten­tions, it’s easy to in­ad­ver­tently get your­self in trou­ble if you’re not fully aware of the rules.

“It’s best to play it safe and talk to an ex­pert like a book­keeper or ac­coun­tant first.”

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