FIVE-STAR STYLE

Sunday Herald Sun - Escape - - TRAVEL WISDOM LUXURY HOTELS - TIANA TEMPLEMAN

A stay in a lux­ury ho­tel or re­sort is top of the list for many trav­ellers cel­e­brat­ing a spe­cial oc­ca­sion, whether it’s a hon­ey­moon, an­niver­sary or last hol­i­day hur­rah as a cou­ple be­fore chil­dren ar­rive.

But if you don’t reg­u­larly visit fives­tar ho­tels, a stay like this can be any­thing but re­lax­ing. Th­ese tips will help you make the most of your spe­cial get­away and have the staff think­ing you’re the per­fect guest.

WHAT TO WEAR

Ar­riv­ing at a five-star ho­tel is a bit like meet­ing some­one for the first time. You will feel a lot more con­fi­dent and com­fort­able if you are dressed ap­pro­pri­ately. There is no need to go over­board, but opt­ing for smart ca­sual when you ar­rive , rather than thongs and T-shirt, and ca­sual busi­ness at­tire for a cor­po­rate fives­tar ho­tel is a good rule of thumb.

BE THE PER­FECT GUEST

Re­mem­ber, you are a guest of the ho­tel and should there­fore be­have ap­pro­pri­ately. Make an ef­fort to fit in with the way things are done and be po­lite and treat the staff with re­spect.

I never got used to wear­ing my bathrobe to break­fast at a fancy Ital­ian spa ho­tel, but the re­cep­tion­ist sug­gested it and ev­ery­body else was do­ing it, so I did too.

If you aren’t sure what to do with re­gard to some things, check the in­room com­pen­dium for in­for­ma­tion or call re­cep­tion and ask. For ex­am­ple, if jack­ets are re­quired at the ho­tel’s fine­din­ing restau­rant, this saves you the em­bar­rass­ment of be­ing turned away at the door if you aren’t wear­ing one.

TIP­PING

If the ho­tel you are vis­it­ing is in the US or some­where else with a tip­ping cul­ture, you should def­i­nitely tip.

That said, you shouldn’t feel pres­sured by the at­mos­phere to give

TRUMP IN­TER­NA­TIONAL HO­TEL

more than the norm or to tip for some­thing you can do your­self, such as open­ing the door.

If you are stay­ing in a coun­try where the stan­dard of liv­ing is poor, con­sider tip­ping as many staff as pos­si­ble. Those few dol­lars will mean a lot more to them than they do to you.

DIN­ING LIKE A STAR

Din­ing at a five-star ho­tel can be won­der­ful and in­tim­i­dat­ing in equal mea­sure, es­pe­cially if the restau­rant is a sig­na­ture of the ho­tel or hat­ted with a celebrity chef at the helm. With many five-star ho­tel res­tau­rants, dress stan­dards are high but not of­ten to the ex­tent of for­mal at­tire.

If you don’t own any de­signer out­fits and end up seated near the kitchen, look on the bright side. At least your meals will be hot as they don’t have far to travel.

WHEN THINGS GO WRONG

Things some­times go wrong, even at ho­tels with an im­pres­sive rep­u­ta­tion. This can be es­pe­cially up­set­ting for trav­ellers who rarely treat them­selves to five-star ac­com­mo­da­tion and are there to cel­e­brate a spe­cial oc­ca­sion.

The key to fix­ing any prob­lem is to keep a cool head. It is al­ways best to be calm, re­spect­ful and state clearly what the prob­lem is and how you would like it to be fixed. How­ever, while you are en­ti­tled to com­plain, think care­fully about whether you should. If there is no elec­tric­ity in your suite, that is a se­ri­ous prob­lem.

If your room ser­vice burger ar­rives 10 min­utes late? Not so much.

ONE FI­NAL TIP

It is easy to con­jure up im­ages of a lav­ish prop­erty with in­cred­i­ble staff at five-star ho­tels where you and your part­ner are the cen­tre of the uni­verse. How­ever, the rea­son th­ese ho­tels fall short for some guests is be­cause their ex­pec­ta­tions are un­re­al­is­tic.

There is some­thing to be said for “keepin’ it real”, even when you are stay­ing in five-star splen­dour.

PIC­TURE: SUP­PLIED

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.