HOW I MAKE IT WORK...

AUS­TRALIA’S FIRST LADY OF COM­EDY HAS SPENT 30 YEARS ON OUR SCREENS AND STAGES. AT 48, SHE TALKS ABOUT SEX­ISM IN THE STAND-UP IN­DUS­TRY AND PAVING THE WAY FOR THE NEXT GEN­ER­A­TION

Sunday Herald Sun - Stellar - - Stellar Contents - Watch Julia on at 7.30pm, Septem­ber 13, on SBS.

Comic Julia Mor­ris talks sex­ism and stand-up.

Ithink hu­mour is something that’s in­side you. I as­sume there is some sort of al­go­rithm for it, but I’m not bright enough to work it out. I’ve got­ten where I am by cre­at­ing op­por­tu­ni­ties for my­self. I’ve moved coun­tries many times, liv­ing in the UK and the US. I think gath­er­ing mo­men­tum world­wide helped me when I re­turned to Aus­tralia.

There is a lot of re­jec­tion in act­ing and com­edy, but I’ve learnt over the years to accept that. No one can re­ally take a job from you if the job is right for you.

I don’t think it’s harder for women to suc­ceed in com­edy. All you have to be is funny. When you are com­ing through, I think it’s easy to be­lieve that the boys are get­ting more op­por­tu­ni­ties – and they prob­a­bly are – but I haven’t no­ticed it.

Still, out of ev­ery sin­gle com­edy fes­ti­val comes the ar­ti­cle, “Why aren’t women funny?” I don’t know how I have sur­vived so many years if we aren’t. If peo­ple don’t find me funny, it’s be­cause I am not their sense of hu­mour.

We have gone through the days of peo­ple yelling out “show us your tits” at shows. I used to be like, “Oh, gosh, I don’t even think you want to see them. Do you want to see the big­ger one or the smaller one? They will be pretty amus­ing when I get them out, but surely we can think of something fun­nier.” Deal­ing with crap on­stage is part of get­ting bet­ter. There are many girls who have paved the way for this next gen­er­a­tion of comics to have big star­dom world­wide.

Be­ing a co­me­dian and a woman, there are inevitably go­ing to be ques­tions about what it’s like be­ing a fe­male comic. My hus­band Dan [Thomas] is a re­tired co­me­dian. I don’t think he ever would have been asked about be­ing a “male” co­me­dian. Thank­fully, I’ve been a head­liner for so long that I’m not a “fe­male comic”, I’m a comic.

I don’t re­ally think re­verse sex­ism ex­ists. I’m not ob­jec­ti­fy­ing Dr Chris

[Brown] when we muck around on cam­era on I’m A Celebrity… Get Me Out Of Here! He writes most of those jokes. I’m not touch­ing him, ogling him or do­ing any­thing he finds dis­tress­ing or con­fronting. Peo­ple ask why it’s OK for me to do what I do, and not men. I think, af­ter the mil­lions of years that women have dealt with it, maybe the boys can get a lit­tle slice for a while.

Who Do You Think You

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.