TOHNEAWPOLRALTDE

What’s on your foodie bucket list? We asked 10 well-trav­elled chefs, cooks and au­thors, who nom­i­nated the amaz­ing dishes around the ME­GAN MILLER re­ports

Sunday Herald Sun - Stellar - - Delicious On Sunday - Go to de­li­cious.com.au for our recipes for cane­les and Mike Eggert's black pep­per crab. Plus see a video of Dan Lepard mak­ing ta­los.

Land­marks are lovely and shop­ping is fun, but so of­ten it’s the food that makes a hol­i­day truly mem­o­rable. Ex­plor­ing a cul­ture through its cui­sine is re­ward­ing, in­sight­ful and scrump­tious, es­pe­cially if you know what to or­der.

With this in mind, we asked a clutch of lead­ing chefs and food iden­ti­ties to nom­i­nate their must-eat dishes from around the globe.

The re­sult is an in­ter­na­tional hit list of stand­out meals, from the mar­kets of Shang­hai to the Basque coast, from spice-filled In­dia to truf­fle-strewn Italy.

Put the Miche­lin guide away. Al­most all of our ex­perts rec­om­mend eat­ing like a lo­cal at unas­sum­ing restau­rants. These are the dishes worth trav­el­ling for.

AN­DREW MCCON­NELL, CHEF- RESTAU­RA­TEUR AT MELBOURNE EATER­IES IN­CLUD­ING THE NEW CHI­NESE-SKEWED RICKY & PINKY

“When I first moved to Shang­hai in the 1990s, it was a very dif­fer­ent city to now. In the mar­kets, a few Chi­nese RMB would buy you a plate of sheng jian bao dumplings, the lo­cal spe­cialty that are more rus­tic than the xiao long bao served in restau­rants. The sea­soned pork fill­ing is wrapped in a thin, bread-like pas­try skin. The dumplings are placed in a large shal­low fry­pan, topped with a wooden lid and cooked with a splash of wa­ter to steam as the base crisps up. Six dumplings per serve, a stool on the street and a bot­tle of brown vine­gar to douse the pip­ing-hot dumplings. It was the per­fect way to watch a city awaken.”

SHANE DELIA, CHEF AT MAHA IN MELBOURNE

“One of the most beau­ti­ful food ex­pe­ri­ences I have ever had was a peas­ant dish of braised goat with sherry

vine­gar, liv­ers and fried pota­toes. It was pre­pared by my food hero, Charo Carmona, of Arte de Coz­ina in An­te­quera, in the south of Spain. It might not sound like some­thing you would travel half­way around the world for, but it touched my soul and my heart. If I could spend my last days in Charo’s din­ing room, eat­ing and drink­ing with my loved ones, I would die a happy man.”

CUR­TIS STONE, CHEF AT MAUDE AND GWEN RESTAU­RANTS IN LA

“I’m a spice fiend and one of the most mem­o­rable dishes I’ve eaten is the cry­ing tiger pork at Jit­lada in LA. The pork is bathed in a mari­nade of soy, lime, palm sugar, and lots of chilli. It’s then sliced, grilled and served with a nam jim dip­ping sauce. The first thing you ex­pe­ri­ence is this won­der­ful flavour, and then you get a lit­tle warmth in the back of your tongue. Eat an­other piece and the warmth hits the front of your tongue and in­ten­si­fies. Before you know it, your en­tire mouth is on fire. I’m usu­ally cry­ing at the ta­ble and lov­ing it.”

MAR­ION GRASBY, AU­THOR OF

MAR­ION’S KITCHEN MASTERCHEF “I dream of gaeng pu bai cha plu. It’s a tra­di­tional south­ern Thai yel­low crab curry with be­tel leaves that’s not for the faint of heart. It’s eye-wa­ter­ingly spicy and yet af­ter each tin­gling mouth­ful you can’t help but go back for more. This co­conut milk curry is stud­ded with sweet chunks of crab meat and finely shred­ded be­tel leaves that pro­vide a her­bal high note. This is the curry I crave when I’m away from Bangkok and can’t get enough of when I’m there. My favourite ver­sion comes from Khua Kling Pak Sod, which has mul­ti­ple branches in Bangkok.”

IN SYD­NEY AND FOR­MER CON­TES­TANT MIKE EGGERT, CHEF AT PINBONE

“I would travel to Sin­ga­pore for black pep­per blue swimmer crab in a heart­beat. I first en­coun­tered the dish on a late-night out­ing, and was wowed. Such care is taken in the se­lec­tion of the crab – they fo­cus on spawn­ing fe­male crabs – so that the flesh is rich. There is no cream, but­ter or chilli in this dish – it’s just crushed black pep­per­corns and stock thick­ened with an egg. The taste of the crab comes through. It’s served with white rice and fried bread for dip­ping.”

CON­TES­TANT

“Hav­ing fam­ily in Bordeaux, I’ve been lucky enough to have en­joyed my fair share of cane­les, the won­der­ful fluted cakes from south-west France. I still re­mem­ber my first one at 12, when my cousins and I would walk down to the store and over-or­der for petit de­je­uner (break­fast). The best way to eat them is to dunk them in a bowl of cafe au lait. A good canele should be dark and sticky on the out­side and cus­tard-like in the cen­tre. My favourites are from La Toque Cuiv­ree in Le Bous­cat.”

DAN LEPARD, LONDON- BASED, AWARD-WIN­NING BAKER

“In San Se­bas­tian, a beau­ti­ful sea­side town in north­ern Spain, you find these wafer-thin corn­meal flat­breads called ta­los. I made them first with some of my friend’s moth­ers, pour­ing boil­ing wa­ter on corn­meal with oil and salt, worked to a dough, then pat­ted thinly. Two of these char-cooked on a hot­plate, sand­wiched with nutty melted sheep’s milk cheese and cooked ba­con, or a spicy pork sausage called ‘tx­is­torra’, be­come a mighty feast. You’ll see them sold at tra­di­tional street mar­kets.”

LYNDEY MI­LAN, AU­THOR AND TELE­VI­SION PRE­SEN­TER

“About nine years ago my part­ner, John Cal­don, and I called into the Ho­tel Splen­dido in Portofino, for din­ner on the ter­race. I or­dered the sub­lime white truf­fle taglierini, and it was the most mem­o­rable ver­sion I’ve ever had. The aroma hit first – fine strands of hand­made pasta in a creamy white truf­fle sauce, and ethe­real white truf­fle shaved over the top. The heat of the pasta helps re­lease the aroma of the truf­fle. An un­for­get­table con­flu­ence of com­pany, lo­ca­tion, food and ser­vice.”

FRANK CAMORRA, CHEF- OWNER AT MOVIDA IN MELBOURNE

“There is a busy bar called Casa Bal­bino in the town of San­lu­car de Bar­rameda in Spain. It’s de­servedly fa­mous for one thing: tor­tilli­tas de ca­marones. These are tiny, al­most krill-sized prawns cooked in su­per-crispy chickpea frit­ters. It’s one of the most mor­eish and Moor­ish things I have ever eaten. You can see ven­dors sell­ing these tiny prawns in the mar­kets. Casa Bal­bino is the place to eat them while stand­ing at the bar, the waiter chalk­ing up your bill on the counter. It’s the best An­dalu­sian food ex­pe­ri­ence, and one I keep com­ing back for again and again.”

CHRIS­TINE MANFIELD, CHEF, AU­THOR AND TRAVEL WRITER

“One of my all-time favourite dishes is tamarind prawns, a Mo­plah (Mus­lim) dish from Tha­lassery (for­merly Tel­licherry) in Ker­ala, In­dia. It’s in my 2011 book, Tast­ing In­dia. I first tasted this dish at Ay­isha Manzil, a guest­house owned by Faiza and Moosa. On each visit, I have spent time in the kitchen cook­ing with Faiza, and this is one of the fam­ily heir­loom dishes she taught me to make. Ev­ery time I taste it, it re­minds me of those times and the tangy, sour hot flavours bring the prawns alive. It’s ad­dic­tive.”

GLOBAL GOURMET Start the day in Bordeaux with a canele and cof­fee (right), or jet to Shang­hai for sheng jian bao dumplings (left).

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