HOW TO RE­DUCE YOUR WOR­RIES

Sunday Herald Sun - - News -

Set aside 20 min­utes to worry. Get a piece of paper and write down all your wor­ries on the left­hand side of the page and all the ac­tions you are go­ing to take to soothe the wor­ries on the right­hand side of the page. Draw a line be­neath the list and tell your­self you will re­visit the thoughts the next day. Don’t fo­cus on keep­ing a blank mind. Re­live happy thoughts, such as a favourite hol­i­day or mem­ory. If anx­ious or in­tru­sive thoughts crop up, ac­knowl­edge the thought and men­tally vi­su­alise it leav­ing your mind e.g. put the anx­ious thought on a leaf and watch it travel down a stream. If 20-30 min­utes have passed and you are still awake, get out of bed. Sit down and flip through a mag­a­zine or sit qui­etly with a glass of wa­ter for 10 to 15 min­utes. Make sure not to use any elec­tron­ics or turn on lights. When you re­turn to bed, fo­cus on drift­ing. g. Many peo­ple lose sleep wor­ry­ing about the events of the day or what will hap­pen to­mor­row. Af­ter a while, those anx­ious thoughts trans­form to wor­ries about not get­ting enough sleep and whether you’ll be able to op­er­ate at full ca­pac­ity the next day. Stop. Fo­cus on re­lax­ing. Fo­cus on your breath. Try the 4-7-8 tech­nique. Breathe in for four sec­onds, hold for seven sec­onds then slowly re­lease for eight sec­onds. This can help dis­tract the mind from anx­ious thoughts. This will help give the mind and body cues that it is time to sleep. Turn off all elec­tron­ics an hour be­fore sleep. iPads and iPhones have blue light tech­nol­ogy which can dis­rupt mela­tonin pro­duc­tion and can de­lay the onset of sleep. Ad­vice by Dr Frank Cahill, Sleep with Con­fi­dence (clin­i­cal psy­chol­o­gist spe­cial­is­ing in in­som­nia).

TUES­DAY, JUNE 6

• SLEEP RE­STRIC­TION • STOP WOR­RY­ING ABOUT T GET­TING ENOUGH SLEEP P

• HAVE A WORRY SES­SION

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.