JOSS STONE

Af­ter a kid­nap scare and hang­ing with Mick Jag­ger, soul chanteuse Joss Stone re­vis­its her big­gest suc­cess, writes Sam Kel­ton

Sunday Tasmanian - Tassie Living - - Front Page -

UK songstress bares her soul

Q: It has been nine years since Soul Ses­sions. Why wait so long? A: Re­ally, I was just asked to do it and I thought it sounded fun so I did it. I wish there was a deeper rea­son but there isn’t. Steve ( Green­berg, record pro­ducer) had been ask­ing me for a while and I never had the time be­cause I was do­ing other projects.

Q: How did you choose the songs for The Soul Ses­sions:

Vol­ume 2? Was it dif­fer­ent com­pared with the 2003 al­bum process? A: At the start we tried to do it like we did the first one, where we lis­tened to a lot of mu­sic and just picked them and went into the stu­dio with the songs in mind. So I said, ‘‘ Let’s just go in there and pick the songs as we did them.’’ I would pick the songs right be­fore I sang them. Q: You cover The Rolling Stones’ I Got The Blues. Hav­ing worked with Mick Jag­ger in Su­perHeavy, did you tell him you were cov­er­ing the track? A: Did Mick do that song? The funny thing is, I didn’t know half of these songs be­fore Steve played them to me. Q: Has Joss Stone got her mojo back with Vol­ume 2? A:I feel like I never lost it just that peo­ple never both­ered to lis­ten to it. I didn’t get any­thing back – peo­ple are just start­ing to lis­ten to me again. I mean, my voice has grown. There are songs on this al­bum I could never have sung when I was 15. Q: A year ago, two men were ar­rested in a plot to kid­nap you. Can you talk about that? A: The rea­son they don’t want me to talk about it is be­cause it’s a court case and if I say the wrong thing it could put things in jeop­ardy. It’s OK, though, I’ve got more dogs now! Q: Well, how do you cope with the fame that comes along with suc­cess? A: It’s nice to have thou­sands of fans come to your shows and sing all the words. That is re­ally lovely, that peo­ple care for what you do, but I would pre­fer not to have that on my doorstep be­cause I like liv­ing my life. Q: You’re a vet­eran at the age of 25. That must feel weird? A: A lot of it has been a blur but it doesn’t feel like it’s been 10 years – it feels like a life­time, to be hon­est. The only other thing I’ve done other than mu­sic is school and even that I can’t re­ally re­mem­ber be­cause I left when I was 14 or 15. Q: Is there any­thing you would do dif­fer­ently look­ing back on the past 10 years? A: Ooh yes. I’ve ex­pe­ri­enced a lot of s--- re­ally. But the wise per­son learns from some­one who has al­ready lived it.

Q: Are there plans to bring

The Soul Ses­sions: Vol­ume 2

Down Un­der? A: Next year is when I’m hop­ing to come back. I’m pretty jam­packed at the mo­ment with Amer­ica and Europe, and I’m not very good at ge­og­ra­phy but I’m pretty sure those places are nowhere near Aus­tralia. Hope­fully soon. Q: You’re on the same la­bel as Birdy, the 15- year- old singer who is the toast of the town in the UK. What’s it like see­ing some­one re­ceive so much suc­cess at a young age, like you did? A: I love Birdy. She is amaz­ing. I sup­pose if you look at it like that, it’s right: she is very young and very tal­ented. What it makes me think, though, is ‘‘ Oh s---, the poor thing!’’ But she’s got an amaz­ing voice and she’s still go­ing to school. The weird­est thing is my next- door neigh­bour came in one day with her CD and said lis­ten to this. It turns out she’s a daugh­ter of one of her friends, so I got to hear Birdy be­fore it came out. I’m so ex­cited to see what she is go­ing to be be­cause she has much more con­trol than I ever did at 15, and she plays the pi­ano like no­body’s busi­ness.

Q: You’ve starred in The Tu­dors, Amer­i­can

Dreams and even voiced a hooker in Amer­i­can Dad. Are there any more screen roles on the hori­zon? A: You know, I wish there was. I’ve been mak­ing so much mu­sic I haven’t had the chance to go and do some­thing like that again. It is so much fun, hon­estly you just dress up and pre­tend to be some­one else.

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