PRESS PLAY

Sunday Tasmanian - Tassie Living - - TECH - Mike Wil­cox Email mike@ hy­per­ac­tiveg­ames. com

METRO: LAST LIGHT

RRP: $ 69 ( re­viewed on PC)

THE se­quel to Metro 2033 once again puts play­ers in the sludge-soaked boots of Ar­tyom, a post­nu­clear sur­vivor in the sub­ter­ranean tun­nels of Rus­sia’s metro sys­tem.

The story picks up at the end of the first game, when the in­fected Dark Ones were elim­i­nated by a mis­sile strike, sad­dling Ar­tyom with the guilt of wip­ing out a race that might not have been as evil as be­lieved.

Com­pared to 2033, Last Light’s story is richer and the world of the Metro is more en­gag­ing, a point ham­mered home by densely pop­u­lated set­tle­ments.

How­ever, the game play has im­proved al­most too much. Ukraine de­vel­oper 4A Games clearly took on board crit­i­cism of 2033, par­tic­u­larly re­gard­ing the lack of ammo, dom­i­neer­ing com­put­er­con­trolled char­ac­ters and the gen­eral un­bal­anced game­play that put the player at a dis­ad­van­tage.

While 2033 was at times frus­trat­ingly diffi cult, the in­ten­sity of feel­ing like a ven­er­a­ble sur­vival­ist was in­cred­i­ble.

In Last Light, much of that sen­sa­tion is miss­ing. Weapons are more pow­er­ful, ammo is plen­ti­ful and en­e­mies go down eas­ier while Ar­tyom is tougher to kill.

But the good news is the com­bat is still tense and fun. Light­ing ef­fects are well done, while the high- end vi­su­als are backed by a unique artis­tic de­sign.

Un­for­tu­nately, the vi­su­als are marred by oc­ca­sional glitches and the game caused my PC to crash more than once.

Last Light isn’t bad, it sim­ply for­got what made 2033 so good.

Those seek­ing a tougher chal­lenge can buy the down­load­able Ranger Mode, which un­locks the high­est diffi culty set­ting – but I think it’s a bit cheeky not in­clud­ing it for free.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.