Avail­able:

Sunday Tasmanian - Tassie Living - - MOVIES - How did you come across this ex­tra­or­di­nary story of real- life spook hunters Les­lie and Ed War­ren? What did you make of the War­rens? Did they make you be­lieve in the supernatural, or were you al­ready a be­liever? It sounds like you have a pretty open mind

Get through the am­a­teur­ish set- up, scene af­ter scene of deplorable per­for­mances and clunky plot­ting and this mur­der mys­tery set on a plane will still dis­ap­point. It hints at go­ing to some in­ter­est­ing places but don’t be fooled – it doesn’t.

YETI ( MA)

Marc Me­nard, Carly Pope Di­rec­tor: Paul Ziller Avail­able: Now on DVD

Stars:

A plane of col­lege foot­ballers and var­i­ous other young­sters be­come snacks for a snow mon­ster ( guy in a fur suit, re­ally) in this hi­lar­i­ously bad crea­ture fea­ture that dies un­der the weight of its own dumb­ness. THE NUM­BERS STA­TION ( MA)

John Cu­sack, Malin Ack­er­man Di­rec­tor: Kasper Bar­foed

Stars:

Now on DVD and Blu- ray It’s hard to not have heard of th­ese guys when you have made as many movies as I have in this genre – their names just kept com­ing up. Af­ter the first In­sid­i­ous movie I didn’t re­ally want to make an­other ghost story or haunted house film, but the idea of do­ing a film “based on true life char­ac­ters” was what in­trigued me. Af­ter In­sid­i­ous I knew I wanted to get back into stu­dio film­mak­ing and the way to do that is to do some­thing you have been suc­cess­ful in, but at a stu­dio level. They weren’t go­ing to give me a ro­man­tic com­edy af­ter In­sid­i­ous so I knew I had to do some­thing in that world or with that kind of flavour. I wanted to have a movie that was sub­jec­tive through their point of view and that of the fam­ily in the film. The War­rens come in and help the fam­ily go­ing through re­ally bad supernatural ex­pe­ri­ences and I wanted to hear their sto­ries and tell it from their per­spec­tive. I’m not here to make a doc­u­men­tary but I wanted to bring my ap­proach to how I see this world. Def­i­nitely. I was raised with a pretty strict Chris­tian up­bring­ing, but com­ing from an Asian back­ground as well I grew up with a lot of ghost sto­ries and su­per­sti­tion. So from a very young age I was sub­jected to this world and have been very much fas­ci­nated by it. One time I woke up in a ho­tel room and I thought I saw some­thing, but I sup­pressed that and told my­self I did not see a ghost. If I be­lieved I saw a ghost I would be ter­ri­fied be­yond be­lief and I would not be able to make th­ese films. Peo­ple say to me that be­cause I make a lot of th­ese films I must not be afraid of ghosts. Quite the con­trary. I am a real chicken when it comes to the supernatural and I be­lieve my fear of that is what al­lows me to tackle th­ese films.

Both. Peo­ple have been sit­ting around camp­fires and telling ghost sto­ries since the dawn of time, so that means we love to be scared and love the roller- coaster ride th­ese movies take us on. But the flip- side of that is peo­ple are so used to see­ing th­ese sto­ries so it takes a lot to scare a mod­ern au­di­ence. Try­ing to stay one step ahead is quite a chal­lenge but that’s what I strive to do with all my films. There is a gen­uine love for the genre that is just built in. I think a big part of that is the sec­ond- big­gest com­mer­cial hol­i­day in the US is Hal­loween and they love to dress up and scare each other. I think it’s very much en­trenched in their pop cul­ture. In­sid­i­ous didn’t do as strongly in Aus­tralia as it did in the US and other parts of the world, yet the first Saw did crazy good in Aus­tralia. I don’t know why some things work and some things don’t. We re­ally gave it a shot. We spent a year to two years try­ing to get fi­nanc­ing for Saw in Aus­tralia and we just couldn’t get it off the ground. I have been want­ing to for a while. I would love to take a pro­ject back to Melbourne. All my fam­ily is in Perth so they have been want­ing me to shoot some­thing in Western Aus­tralia. I have been try­ing to hint that fu­ture Fast and Furious films should be shot in Aus­tralia. I am knee- deep in pre- pro­duc­tion and it’s a pretty crazy world, but I have been want­ing to make a big- bud­get ac­tion film for­ever.

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