THE WHIS­PERER

Sunday Tasmanian - Tassie Living - - PETS - Anne Box­hall Email abox­hall@ big­pond. com

AREADER of this col­umn r ecently came across a dog in­side a car, parked in the sun for close to half an hour.

The dog was dis­tressed, pant­ing heav­ily, with no wa­ter and very lit­tle ven­ti­la­tion.

The owner even­tu­ally re­turned but be­came de­fen­sive when ap­proached about the state of his dog.

Grey ar­eas re­main around reg­u­la­tions on leav­ing car win­dows down.

It’s likely the legally per­mit­ted num­ber of cen­time­tres a win­dow can be left open in an unat­tended car is not ad­e­quate to safe­guard an an­i­mal left in­side.

If some­one knows the fi ner de­tail of these reg­u­la­tions, please email me.

Ei­ther way, it’s hard to fathom be­ing booked for en­sur­ing your dog has suffi cient airfl ow.

Sim­i­larly, reg­u­la­tions around break­ing a car win­dow to re­trieve an an­i­mal ex­pir­ing from heat are a bit tricky in prac­tise.

Clearly, it’s il­le­gal to go around break­ing car win­dows but how does this stack up against the An­i­mal Wel­fare Act or the moral im­per­a­tive to save an an­i­mal trapped in a car and suf­fer­ing from heat stroke?

All this can eas­ily be avoided by sim­ply not leav­ing pets in cars on warm days.

An­i­mals in parked cars can be over­come with heat stroke in a mat­ter of min­utes, even when win­dows are left down.

It’s just not safe to do it. Over the sum­mer months, pets need re­lief from the sun and heat and would be happy to share some shade with you.

Signs of heat stress are ex­ces­sive pant­ing, sali­vat­ing and ag­i­tated be­hav­iour.

On days of high fi re dan­ger, ca­nine be­haviourist Tracey Hard­cas­tle sug­gests hav­ing a dog or cat re­lo­ca­tion kit ready to go.

It would in­clude food, wa­ter, a bowl, spare col­lar and lead for dogs, bed­ding, favourite toy, travel crate, med­i­ca­tions, your con­tact de­tails and a friend’s con­tact de­tails in case you be­come sep­a­rated from your pet.

If not re­lo­cat­ing on an ex­treme fi re day, pets are best kept in­side the house where they can stay cool and calm.

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