Com­ing of age

Sunday Tasmanian - Tassie Living - - MOVIES - 52 TUES­DAYS Opens at the State Cin­ema on May 1

I think 16 to 17 is a re­ally mas­sive point in in­form­ing who you are and how you feel about

things and people change a lot re­gard­less

dur­ing that time

CARIS BIZZACA

THE phrase ‘ grow­ing up on screen’ took on a very lit­eral mean­ing for ac­tress Tilda Cob­ham- Her­vey in 52 Tues­days. Shot ev­ery Tues­day over a year, it was Ade­laide- born Cob­ham- Her­vey’s fi rst act­ing gig and, like her 16- year- old char­ac­ter Bil­lie, she was at a ma­jor point in her life.

“I think 16 to 17 is a re­ally mas­sive point in in­form­ing who you are and how you feel about things and people change a lot re­gard­less dur­ing that time,” she says.

“I was sort of pro­pelled into it at ex­treme force be­cause we were talk­ing about things that I never imag­ined talk­ing about, ex­plor­ing and al­ways ques­tion­ing each other.”

In 52 Tues­days, the fea­ture- fi lm de­but for award- win­ning doc­u­men­tary fi lm­maker Sophie Hyde, Cob­ham- Her­vey plays a teenager who dis­cov­ers her mother wants to gen­der tran­si­tion to a man.

Bil­lie moves in with her fa­ther for a year, so her mother, James ( played by Del Her­bert), can be­gin the process. How­ever, they prom­ise to see each other once a week, ev­ery Tues­day.

Hyde says the unique struc­ture was there from the be­gin­ning, be­fore char­ac­ters or story.

“That was what the writer Matt ( Cor­mack) came to us with, was ev­ery Tues­day for a year two people meet and we fi lm it on Tues­days,” she says.

And when they de­cided on the story, it wasn’t a con­crete thing. They were con­stantly shift­ing, script­ing and chang­ing it as they went.

“There were lots of things to think about. How much can you tell. What are you miss­ing in the week that passes ... also what can be lo­gis­ti­cally fi lmed, be­cause a lot of the scenes we’re fi lm­ing in a day would be two or three days in a nor­mal shoot,” she says. “Those con­cerns are al­ways around.” This style of fi lm­mak­ing meant the ac­tors would fi nd out what hap­pened to their char­ac­ter week by week.

Cob­ham- Her­vey says once fi lm­ing on a Tues­day wrapped, they would get their scripts for the fol­low­ing week.

“So of­ten it was that thing of, you were go­ing through the last shot, and it was like, ‘ Yes, I get the script, I get to see what hap­pens’.”

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