BRIDGE

Sunday Tasmanian - Tassie Living - - WATCH ON PRESTO - with DOU­GLAS NEW­LANDS

My sis­ter played an ex­cel­lent hand re­cently in the Waver­ley Congress. She opened 1NT on the South hand and North forced in spades. When South cue bid 4C, suggest­ing slam suit­abil­ity, North used RKC: 5D show 3 key­cards and 5NT showed all the key­cards were held. 6C showed the KC and North bid the grand slam. South had no ex­tras and, when West led the jack of clubs, de­clarer could only count twelve tricks and the only ex­tra chance seems to be a 3-3 break in clubs which is less likely af­ter the lead. Can you see how to play this hand?

Hav­ing only one loser prompts one to look for a squeeze but West can’t be squeezed in hearts and clubs be­cause East can also guard the hearts. For the same rea­son, you can’t squeeze East in the reds. How­ever, you can play both squeezes at the same time – a dou­ble squeeze. To make this work, you need to cash as many side suit win­ners as pos­si­ble be­fore the last trump so that both squeezes will work.

Draw trumps, cash the high clubs, the AH and the rest of the trumps. Be­fore the last trump the po­si­tion is

Now, on the last trump, East must keep two di­a­monds and so lets go a heart and South can dis­card a di­a­mond since it has ful­filled its func­tion as a threat against East. West can dis­card a di­a­mond but when de­clarer now plays the ace of di­a­monds, West can­not guard both hearts and clubs and the con­tract makes.

Well played sis!

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