Lo­cal food:

The steaks are high in this week’s five of the best.

Sunday Tasmanian - Tassie Living - - CONTENTS -

St Albi’s ST ALBI’S COX RUB STEAK

Named af­ter head chef Ge­orge Cox, St Albi’s sig­na­ture steak features 10 dif­fer­ent spices which com­bine to cre­ate a beau­ti­ful Texan flavour. The Cox Rub helped put St Albi’s on the food map, and is in­cred­i­bly more-ish, draw­ing din­ers back time af­ter time.

49 Al­bert Rd, Moonah

Land­scape LAND­SCAPE CAPE GRIM T-BONE

The unique 700g Cape Grim T-Bone steak at Land­scape Restau­rant & Grill is aged in-house, and the cen­tre cut is used for the largest part of the eye fil­let. A blend of Tas­ma­nian hard­wood and a se­lec­tion of sherry, bour­bon or port cask from the Tas­ma­nian Cooper Com­pany is used in the Asado Grill, cre­at­ing a su­perb flavour. 25 Hunter St, Ho­bart

Ball & Chain BALL & CHAIN GRILL’S RUMP

Cooked in a char­coal grill, the Ball & Chain’s rump steak is packed with an in­cred­i­ble flavour punch. The steak is not pre­sea­soned, which means the burst of flavour comes di­rectly from the meat it­self. It re­quires a lit­tle ex­tra work in the jaw depart­ment be­cause of its den­sity, but din­ers agree the taste is well worth it. 87 Sala­manca Pl, Sala­manca

Black Cow BLACK COW BISTRO CAPE GRIM RIB EYE

With a range of sizes to choose from up to a mam­moth 750g, the Black Cow Bistro’s flavour­some Cape Grim rib eye steak has a ‘wow’ fac­tor that will leave you want­ing more ... but not right away. It is served with a sump­tu­ous Di­jon potato galette, while the more ad­ven­tur­ous — or hun­gry — can also choose from a se­lec­tion of sides. 70 Ge­orge St, Launce­s­ton

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