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Aus­tralian In­sti­tute of Ar­chi­tects new Tas­ma­nian branch pres­i­dent Yvette Breyten­bach says en­gag­ing an ar­chi­tect is key to achiev­ing cost-ef­fec­tive, sus­tain­able build­ings and ur­ban cen­tres, writes JARRAD BEVAN

Sunday Tasmanian - Tassie Living - - TASSLE LIVING - - Im­me­di­ate past pres­i­dent of the AIA’s Tas­ma­nian branch Brad Wheeler

New AIA Tas pres­i­dent’s blue­print for the fu­ture

EN­GAG­ING an ar­chi­tect is a val­ue­for-money in­vest­ment, says the new pres­i­dent of the Tas­ma­nian chap­ter of the Aus­tralian In­sti­tute of Ar­chi­tects, Yvette Breyten­bach.

Ms Breyten­bach said the ex­per­tise and knowl­edge of an ar­chi­tect was key to achiev­ing cost-ef­fec­tive, sus­tain­able build­ings and ur­ban cen­tres which will con­trib­ute to the long-term growth of Tas­ma­nia’s econ­omy, en­rich the cul­ture and sup­port com­mu­ni­ties.

“What is of­ten for­got­ten is that ar­chi­tects de­liver much more than func­tional build­ings and pleas­ing aes­thet­ics,” she said.

“They de­liver prob­lem-solv­ing so­lu­tions and cre­ate op­por­tu­ni­ties on mul­ti­ple lev­els. An ar­chi­tect is a valu­able part­ner who brings a spe­cialised skillset to any project, cov­er­ing four ar­eas of ex­per­tise: an­a­lyt­i­cal abil­ity, prac­ti­cal un­der­stand­ing, tech­ni­cal skills, and creative vi­sion and flair.

“I would like to see a shift to the point where should peo­ple have a build­ing project to un­der­take, they are not think­ing ‘shall I use an ar­chi­tect’ but rather ‘which one will I choose to work with?’.”

Ms Breyten­bach said ar­chi­tects were sub­stan­tial con­trib­u­tors to the de­sign of cities and towns and in­te­gral to the process of pro­vid­ing qual­ity open spa­ces, pro­tect­ing her­itage, ad­dress­ing af­ford­abil­ity and diver­sity, and con­nect­ing com­mu­ni­ties in a way that en­hances liv­abil­ity and sus­tain­able out­comes.

She said by ad­dress­ing chang­ing needs in a chang­ing world, sus­tain­able de­sign “sup­ports our econ­omy and en­sures com­fort­able, healthy, con­tem­po­rary en­vi­ron­ments” at home, school, work or play.

“Ben­e­fits in­clude im­proved per­sonal well­be­ing and mo­ti­va­tion, flex­i­ble work and learn­ing op­por­tu­ni­ties, in­creased pro­duc­tiv­ity and stu­dent en­gage­ment, and vi­brant, at­trac­tive pub­lic and com­mer­cial ur­ban space,” she said.

Ms Breyten­bach has be­gun a two-year term with the in­sti­tute tak­ing over the po­si­tion from Brad Wheeler.

Mr Wheeler will work closely with Ms Breyten­bach and pro­vide sup­port in his role as im­me­di­ate past pres­i­dent.

He said it had been an im­mense priv­i­lege to serve as state pres­i­dent of the In­sti­tute. “Our in­sti­tute is not sim­ply a lobby group; our mem­bers are pas­sion­ate about mak­ing Tas­ma­nia an even bet­ter place to live and work for the whole com­mu­nity. I wish Yvette well for her term and look for­ward to work­ing with her as we strive to achieve the best re­sults for our state.”

Our in­sti­tute is not sim­ply a lobby group; our mem­bers are pas­sion­ate about mak­ing Tas­ma­nia an even bet­ter place to live and work for the whole com­mu­nity

Pic­ture: RICHARD JUPE

ABOVE: Yvette Breyten­bach is look­ing for­ward to her new role with the Aus­tralian In­sti­tute of Ar­chi­tects. One of the Tas­ma­nian projects (right) to make the fi­nals in this year’s awards.

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