SMART SHOP­PER

We an­swer the big ques­tions on bulk buy­ing with the help of ex­perts and our Face­book friends.

Super Food Ideas - - CONTENTS -

1 EASY DOES IT

If you’re a new­comer to bulk buy­ing, start small and stock up on items you know and like. If a brand you don’t usu­ally buy is on sale, buy one and try it first. Items with a long shelf life, such as rice and pasta are great to bulk buy. Be mind­ful of buy­ing treats in bulk; more in the pantry may mean you eat more, mak­ing it costly for both the wal­let and the waist­line!

2 BIG­GER ISN’T AL­WAYS BET­TER

To max­imise a bulk buy, be aware of the cost per unit. Unit prices let you com­pare prod­ucts be­tween brands and sizes, by com­par­ing like for like. It may sound sim­ple, but it’s of­ten over­looked, es­pe­cially if a bulk item looks like a bar­gain.

3 FREEZE THE FRESH

Whether it’s batch cook­ing or freez­ing, when it comes to fresh food, have a plan. While meat is an ob­vi­ous choice to buy in bulk and freeze, don’t rule out fruit and veg­eta­bles. Broc­coli, cau­li­flower, corn and beans freeze well as do berries and or­anges.

4 WHERE TO SHOP

Su­per­mar­kets aren’t the only place to buy in bulk. Green­gro­cers, bak­eries and farm­ers’ mar­kets of­ten of­fer dis­counts at dif­fer­ent times of the day. Bulk-buy­ing ware­house clubs such as Costco are also be­com­ing in­creas­ingly pop­u­lar. Al­though there is an an­nual mem­ber­ship fee and stor­age to con­sider (where do you put it all?), sav­ings can def­i­nitely out­weigh the ini­tial cost.

5 MORE THE MER­RIER

Team up with friends or neigh­bours to split up bulk-buy pur­chases, or con­sider join­ing a bulk food or vegie box co-op. Co-ops pur­chase from whole­salers, such as fruit and vegie mar­kets, so mem­bers pay less (see our ex­pert ad­vice, below). If there isn’t a co-op in your area, why not start one of your own?

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