HE COULD BE BE­LIEVED

Surfing World - - Contents - Derek Hynd, Fric­tion Free Rev­o­lu­tion­ary

bout Bernard Midget Far­relly – alot’s go­ing to be writ­ten over the days, weeks, months. Bring­ing it all down to the nub though – He Could Be Be­lieved – He Was Worth Be­liev­ing. Thus he was one of the great­est ex­cep­tions to the rule of surf­ing. Sim­ply, telling it the way it was. Eru­dite to an in­tri­cate fault, span­ning the dis­ci­plines of Surf Board Rid­ing, Hang Glid­ing and Wind Surf­ing from pi­o­neer lev­els, de­vel­op­ing an in­dus­try around his tal­ent; and be­ing ar­guably the great­est con­test surfer of the 1960s via Makaha then Manly then run­ner up losses in count­backs at Puerto Rico and Bells, Midget was far more of a broad doyen than just about any­one who has ever ex­isted in the life­style. Crit­i­cally im­por­tant was the grand en­dur­ing con­tro­versy sur­round­ing Nat, Bob, and the rise of the Witzig me­dia style – lit­tle known amidst this shift in surf­ing world pol­i­tics at the cen­tre of the mid ‘60s was a pro­found per­sonal tragedy that far out­weighed any sup­posed new way of pre­sent­ing surf­ing to the public. Sim­ply, things far closer to home changed the man. Surf shit was penny ante com­pared to a far big­ger pic­ture – Life, Death and The Uni­verse. A truly great man, gone.

A

Midget’s full rail hack down from the in­fa­mous 1970 Worlds at Jo­hanna, where he went ag­o­nis­ingly close to claim­ing a sec­ond Cham­pi­onship. (Drew Kam­pion)

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