KEEL OVER AND FLY

Surfing World - - Introduction - By Hugh Wyllie

The con­test spon­sored by a rock band that saw the World Champ de­feated by a ve­gan yogi on a board in­spired by Aus­tralia II’S Amer­ica’s cup win. Wel­come to Bells Beach 1984.

WHEN ONE OF THE NA­TION’S GREAT­EST ROCK AND ROLL BANDS DE­CIDES TO CO-HOST THE LONG­EST RUN­NING CON­TEST IN AUS­TRALIAN SURF­ING – YOU’D EX­PECT NOTH­ING SHORT OF THE EX­CEP­TIONAL – AND IT WAS, RIGHT THROUGH THE EASTER WEEK­END OF 1984 ON THE RAGGED CLIFFS OF BELLS BEACH. THE WORLD’S ELITE COM­PET­I­TIVE SURFERS WERE THERE, THRASH­ING OUT TO THE FRET­TED ON­SLAUGHT BE­TWEEN HEATS, AS THE CROWD SURGED DOWN THE GOAT TRACK AND OUT TO RINCON, COPPING ALL THE NOISE, SPRAY AND MAY­HEM ALONG THE WAY. HOW­EVER, THROUGH ALL OF THIS, THERE WAS ONE ELITE SURFER IN PAR­TIC­U­LAR WHO COM­MANDED THE SPEC­TA­CLE, MATERIALISING FROM HIS YOGI HIDEAWAY, RIPPED LIKE A GREEK STATUE AND WIELD­ING A BLADE MORE SAILBOAT THAN SURF­BOARD. HE WOULD BAT­TLE THE NEW WORLD CHAMP A WEEK OUT FROM HIS IN­DUC­TION, AND PINCH A PRIZE JEWEL FROM SURF­ING’S CROWN, ON THE SAME DE­SIGN AND IN MUCH THE SAME WAY AUS­TRALIA’S SAIL TEAM DID IT TO THE YANKS THE PRE­VI­OUS YEAR AT THE 1983 AMER­ICA’S CUP. THIS IS THE TRUE STORY OF THE 1984 RIP CURL / AUS­TRALIAN CRAWL BELLS BEACH PRO. THIS IS THE TRUE STORY OF CHEYNE HO­RAN AND HIS WINGED KEEL.

THE CUP

Hon Bob Hawke AC (Prime Min­is­ter 1983-1991): Of all the things I said and did dur­ing the term of my Prime Min­is­ter­ship, my as­so­ci­a­tion with Aus­tralia win­ning the Amer­ica’s Cup in 1983 would have to be one of the most en­dur­ing. Not that I did any­thing to win the Cup; that hon­our be­longs to the late Alan Bond, John Ber­trand and his skill­ful crew, and of course Ben Lex­cen, the de­signer of the fa­mous se­cret weapon, the winged keel of Aus­tralia II which wres­tled yacht­ing’s most fa­mous Cup from Amer­ica af­ter 132 years of com­plete dom­i­na­tion. The race cap­tured the na­tion’s imag­i­na­tion when, af­ter the elim­i­na­tion of four or five other na­tions, Aus­tralia II be­came the of­fi­cial chal­lenger for the Cup. The build-up to the fi­nal – it was three all – gave an air of great

an­tic­i­pa­tion, and when Aus­tralia II surged ahead af­ter trail­ing for most of the race, vic­tory was in sight. The win brought great joy and de­light to the length and breadth of the na­tion. It would seem that, dur­ing the heady cel­e­bra­tions, the words I ut­tered ie “Any­one who sacks an em­ployee for not turn­ing up for work to­day is a bum” added to the ela­tion of win­ning. We had taken on the best in the world in a David and Go­liath bat­tle, and won. It cer­tainly lifted our spir­its and will be a mo­ment fondly re­mem­bered by many for­ever.

John Ber­trand (Skip­per, Aus­tralia II): We broke the 132 year stran­gle­hold the Amer­i­can’s had on the cup. That was our fourth Amer­ica’s cup chal­lenge so we had a lot of ex­pe­ri­ence with los­ing over a 12 year pe­riod be­fore we could ac­tu­ally get our act to­gether for the win.

Cheyne Ho­ran (Pro surfer, Yogi): I fol­lowed the Amer­ica’s Cup, dur­ing the race we kept hav­ing me­chan­i­cal and struc­tural fail­ures like masts break­ing, sails rip­ping. We were down to 3-nil and came back to 3-all and then it was the last race to win. The con­di­tions changed and the boat was ab­so­lutely fly­ing. Af­ter watch­ing Aus­tralia II win the race so eas­ily, I wanted to know more about the keel.

John Ber­trand: I re­call Ben (Lex­cen) talk­ing about the winglets on surf­boards very early. Benny was an in­cred­i­ble racon­teur, and would have fit­ted in very well with the surf­ing world.

BEN & CHEYNE

John Ber­trand: Ben Lex­cen was the Leonardo Da Vinci of this coun­try. He went to school at 9 and left at 12, pre­sum­ably un­teach­able, but he was the most bril­liant per­son that I’ve ever come across. His was un­fit­ted think­ing, which comes from not hav­ing a western style ed­u­ca­tion in many ways. Ben was a real cool guy. Typical of Benny, when the surf­ing world came knock­ing, which is part of the DNA of this coun­try, he was en­thu­si­as­ti­cally in­volved.

Ge­off Mccoy (Mas­ter shaper): Cheyne was head and shoul­ders the very best dur­ing his time as a pro surfer. He had a fu­tur­is­tic out­look and ap­proach to the way he wanted to ride waves, which was quite dif­fer­ent to all other surfers of that pe­riod. Be­cause of his unique ap­proach he po­lar­ized the sta­tus quo with both his sheer bril­liance and his care­free way.

Cheyne Ho­ran: I didn’t suc­cumb to what ev­ery­body else was us­ing and what ev­ery­body else calls nor­mal. I was look­ing for things on the cut­ting edge. I wanted to cre­ate some­thing dif­fer­ent. I met Ben Lex­cen some months af­ter the Cup. Straight away we got on like a house on fire. Ben was a su­per nice per­son, and his roots were in surf­ing. He used to work for Gor­don Woods shap­ing surf­boards. And he used to make boats as a kid and race his own sail­boats us­ing dif­fer­ent de­signs. I took the boards of the era to him. He showed me a whole bunch of changes. At that time, we had boards that had edge from nose to tail that were sharp as. Ben said to take the edge back all the way to the front of the fin. He be­lieved the edge should only be around the tail. That stopped a lot of the catch up the front and mid­dle of the board and al­lowed the board to go fast. Then the bot­tom curve, we changed that to in­crease speed. Ini­tially, I’d de­sign the out­lines but the front rail and tail rails were all Ben Lex­cen’s. He knew so much about ma­te­ri­als, the struc­tures of ma­te­ri­als, the strengths of resins and steels and alu­minums and car­bons. He taught me all about the ways wind and wa­ter per­form on shape.

THE KEEL

Cheyne Ho­ran: We wanted to bring the Amer­ica’s cup keel to a surf­board and we did a lot of work on get­ting the boards and the fin right. Ben used to have an of­fice in Dee Why so we did all our de­vel­op­ment and prac­ti­cal there, which worked out great be­cause it was so close to Dee Why Point – a great test zone. We wanted the board to lift up out of the wa­ter, pop up. Ben would al­ways say, “It’s gotta feel like it wants to jump out of the wa­ter.”

John Ber­trand: That’s what the winged keel is all about. When you do turns, a keel, or fins, gen­er­ate side lift that give you trac­tion. With side lift there’s drag as­so­ci­ated with tip vor­tices so the ob­jec­tive with the winglets is to smooth out the tip vor­tices and re­duce the over­all drag as a re­sult. Do that and you can bank your turns with less drop off in speed.

Cheyne Ho­ran: It’s us­ing all the power you’ve cre­ated. Not los­ing it. The stan­dard fin to­day loses lots of the power it cre­ates through flex or, over the tips. The wings mean you don’t lose any pres­sure. All the power you cre­ate, noth­ing goes over the tip be­cause it stays on the fin. With a straight based fin a lot of the power goes over the tip.

John Ber­trand: When you see a jet at 40,000 feet in the air and you see the va­por trails off the wings, that is the air con­dens­ing be­cause ve­loc­ity is chang­ing dra­mat­i­cally – the air is go­ing from high to low pres­sure and stream­ing off the tip of the wings. This stream­ing from high to low, go­ing into a vor­tex, is ex­actly what hap­pens with the fin of a surf­board mov­ing through wa­ter. Har­ness­ing that en­ergy in­stead of los­ing it – that was the idea be­hind the Amer­ica’s cup keel.

THE BOARD

Cheyne Ho­ran: At the time Mccoy and I had split. We had to go our sep­a­rate ways to grow. We split over dif­fer­ent rea­sons, but the rea­sons that we split weren’t the rea­sons that we split.

Ge­off Mccoy: Surf­ing’s con­trollers of the time were fright­ened and threat­ened by what Cheyne and I were do­ing to­gether.

Cheyne Ho­ran: There had been a bunch of guys I was con­sid­er­ing to help me with a board that would work for the fin. A re­ally good Aus­tralian shaper was Terry Fitzger­ald. I ended up go­ing with him and Neal Pur­chase.

Terry Fitzger­ald (Sul­tan of speed): We were over at Triggs at an APSA event, Cheyne was cu­ri­ous about why my boards were go­ing so fast in the beachies. He rode mine, asked if I could shape a cou­ple us­ing my con­cave/vee set-ups adapted to his pretty bloody fu­tur­is­tic ideas. A chal­lenge, but good fun... and easy to do.

Cheyne Ho­ran: It was af­ter Triggs that we made the first keel. De­cem­ber 1983. Bells was the fol­low­ing April. Terry was open to the de­sign and his in­ter­pre­ta­tion of it was per­fect. When I got the board I took it to Ben. He said “Yep, that’s what you need for the fin to per­form.” So Ben’s ge­nius matched by Terry’s thread, be­ing the con­cave and vee, helped the board go faster than any­thing I’d rid­den… and then the keel made it go faster again. We’d put in the work and dis­cov­ered some­thing un­seen and un­felt. We’d found the win­ning for­mula.

SE­CRECY

John Ber­trand: Aus­tralia II was the first time any Amer­ica’s cup team had ever kept the keel se­cret. To­tal se­crecy. It was cold war stuff.

Op­po­site: Cracked Bells, bro­ken cups and winged keels. All the lyrics you need for an 80s folk-pop-nu-tech-ca­lypso banger... There will never be an­other ‘Er­rol,’ just ac­cept it, ok?

Cheyne Ho­ran: I kept it un­der wraps for a long time. The guys at Bondi saw it first. My very first surf on it I felt like I was fly­ing. This guy dropped in on me and I overtook him like he was go­ing back­wards. I knew what a nor­mal fin went like and this was an en­tirely new world. There was so much speed, the fin was lift­ing the board up, and the con­trol was in­cred­i­ble.

THE ROAD TO BELLS

Doug War­brick (Rip Curl founder): There was a freesurf­ing ses­sion down the coast with Wayne Lynch, Tom Cur­ren, Cheyne Ho­ran and one cam­era­man, Peter Craw­ford.

Cheyne Ho­ran: It was in­ter­est­ing that Rip Curl had put us to­gether. Tom Cur­ren and I on a surf trip just be­fore Bells. Cur­ren was al­ready con­sid­ered a fu­ture World Cham­pion and the com­pet­i­tive­ness be­tween us was al­ready in­tense. Peter Craw­ford was with us and he kept say­ing to me “He’s surf­ing bet­ter than you mate, you’re gonna have to lift your game.” But I was pur­pose­fully surf­ing lower than my best be­cause I thought “If I get him at Bells, that’s when I’m gonna lift.” I didn’t want him to even see my game. It was all very tac­ti­cal while we were on that trip.

Doug War­brick: The wave they were rid­ing was a lit­tle bit like Bells. That was prob­a­bly a good warm up for Cheyne. A lit­tle bit like Rincon and Bells but with a bit more push and a lit­tle more hol­low. Very close to rocks. They just lit the place up. Re­ally lit it up. Cheyne

“MY VERY FIRST SURF ON IT I FELT LIKE I WAS FLY­ING. THIS GUY DROPPED IN ON ME AND I OVERTOOK HIM LIKE HE WAS GO­ING BACK­WARDS.”– CHEYNE HO­RAN

was hav­ing no prob­lem go­ing blow for blow with Tom Cur­ren. And Cheyne was us­ing the winged keel.

THE 1984 RIP CURL / AUS­TRALIAN CRAWL BELLS BEACH SURF­ING FES­TI­VAL James Reyne (Singer, Aus­tralian Crawl):

Most bands surfed in those days but we were es­pe­cially big surf­ing fans. We grew up on the Morn­ing­ton Pen­nisula. Brad Robin­son and Guy Mc­donough were re­ally good surfers and I’d drive them around. I re­mem­ber when Rip Curl was just a lit­tle surf shop down at Torquay and Bells was a big deal for us. We’d go there and be like, “Oh wow, there’s Rab­bit, there’s Cheyne!” We were star-struck be­cause th­ese were our heroes of the time, and the fact that we got to be so up close with them was fan­tas­tic. The Crawl be­came co spon­sors for two years in 83-84. How did that come about? Who knows? Prob­a­bly sit­ting in a bar go­ing “Hey, you know what could be a great idea!” ( Laughs) It seemed like a good idea at the time. The whole thing would have been put to­gether over a beer and a hand­shake. Of course the con­test in those days was much more wild west and nowhere near as so­phis­ti­cated as it is now. I think we put in half the prize­money or half the money to run it and we had nam­ing rights and VIP passes for the bus parked on the cliff for two years ( laughs).

Doug War­brick: There were ob­vi­ously high ex­pec­ta­tions of Tom Car­roll. He was the Aussie favourite and on his way to be­ing one of the great surfers of all time. High ex­pec­ta­tions of the rank and file crowd that turned up at ev­ery level. He was Aus­tralia’s main man at that time. It was a very strong time for high per­for­mance surf­ing.

Tom Car­roll (1983/84 World Cham­pion):

Cheyne had been a re­ally been a big star in the 70s and had al­ready ex­pe­ri­enced a lot of main­stream me­dia at­ten­tion, but by the time he was surf­ing the winged keel he was quite al­ter­na­tive and start­ing to move re­ally strongly in that new di­rec­tion. I was in a re­ally good place at that time. In those days all th­ese mi­nor events con­trib­uted to rank­ings so I’d gone all the way to Florida to get my points up so that I was un­beat­able in the World Ti­tle race go­ing into Bells. I got back and I was on fire. I re­mem­ber land­ing in Sydney think­ing “I’m a World Champ!” It was such a cool feel­ing. Then go­ing down to Bells I felt re­ally free to move the way I wanted to move. I felt good about my­self. I had a new pos­ture. I even took on a new way of walk­ing.

MIND GAMES

Cheyne Ho­ran: Every­one used to play mind games. Th­ese days they put every­one in a locker room and they’re all in there ig­nor­ing each other. In those days you op­er­ated from wher­ever you had your Camp David. So on day one I see Tom Cur­ren sit­ting with his wife on the hill and I walk up and sit right where he can see me and I start look­ing straight at him, straight through him. He looked real ner­vous. I was drilling him. Then all of a sud­den I’ve looked away for a mo­ment and when I look back he’s dis­ap­peared. There’s no sign of him. Gone. He was play­ing me too. So I moved the camp and the next time we saw each other we were on the beach pad­dling out for the quar­ter fi­nal.

Doug War­brick: The heat was out on cen­tre Bells and the waves were de­cent. Cheyne got a great wave. There aren’t too many bar­rels

at Bells but you can some­times slip into the bar­rel at the bowl. And that’s what Cheyne did. He Tom Cur­ren-ed Tom Cur­ren, which is not easy to do.

Cheyne Ho­ran: That was the best heat of the con­test for me. I got this re­ally good wave in front of Tom. I’m on the keel and be­cause they come around cor­ners re­ally fast, I’ve done this high speed cut­back and as I’ve hit the re­bound I came straight off the bot­tom and up into the bar­rel in this one fluid mo­tion. It was like the re­bound hap­pened in­side the bar­rel, like I cut up into it. And who do I see look­ing in at me when I get in­side that tube? Tom Cur­ren. And I’m look­ing at him and he’s look­ing at me, and it was at that mo­ment I knew I had him. That was the fi­nal for me.

THE FI­NAL

Doug War­brick: It was typ­i­cally high tide, the surf was small, the wind was Nor west in the morn­ing, then went a lit­tle more west­erly as the day went on. The tide came in, and the fi­nal was held on lit­tle Rincon. Which was quite good, wasn’t great, but it was peak­ing on the boils out the back, run­ning along the reef and right through into Bells shore­break.

Cheyne Ho­ran: The fi­nal with Tom was in­ter­est­ing. He likes to pad­dle you out of po­si­tion. He did it to me in Cal­i­for­nia once and I thought if that ever hap­pens again I’m tak­ing it to him. My rhythm had been re­ally

“I DIDN’T TRULY BE­LIEVE A WINGED KEEL COULD OUT PER­FORM A THRUSTER AT BELLS. AND I WAS HUM­BLED.” – TOM CAR­ROLL

Op­po­site: A cham­pion’s grin. Note the Aus­tralian Crawl con­test rashie. Mo­ments later Cheyne would climb the fa­mous Bells track and ring the day­lights out of surf­ing’s most fa­mous tro­phy. (Craw­ford)

good on the day, I felt in sync with ev­ery good wave that came.

Doug War­brick: Even though Cheyne would carve the full arc, it was a very short arc. He’d go quite ver­ti­cal and he didn’t go a long way out from the break­ing curl. It was tight arcs in the top. The board looked spot on for the con­di­tions. Ev­ery­thing was com­ing to­gether for him.

Tom Car­roll: I just didn’t ex­pect him to do as well he did. I had my head up my arse re­ally. I did get se­ri­ous in the fi­nal, I must ad­mit, and re­ally tried to ap­ply my­self. But he was in such great rhythm.

Cheyne Ho­ran: The fi­nal in those days was ac­tu­ally a best of three heats, and in one heat I came in with 15 min­utes to go. My friends were say­ing “What are you do­ing?” I said “Heat’s over, I got my waves right.” ( Laughs) They’d count four waves and I had two 9s and an 8 and a 5 so I came in to get dry and warm for the next heat.

Tom Car­roll: I’d won the first heat but in the sec­ond heat the en­ergy shifted. The tide got higher and that stopped the bowl from break­ing and ended my ad­van­tage. When the fi­nal heats shifted over to Rincon I was strug­gling. Get­ting across sec­tions on the back­side at Rincon it’s ex­tremely dif­fi­cult to go top to bot­tom

Cheyne Ho­ran: It’s prob­a­bly the best Rincon I’ve ever had. Tom was go­ing hard at me, but I just thought he was run­ning out of puff.

Doug War­brick: You sat out on the rocks when it was a Rincon fi­nal, and back then you were al­lowed to take beers out there. Oth­ers had bot­tles of cham­pagne and wine. I re­call some­one ac­tu­ally wad­ing out and giv­ing Mike Newl­ing a can of beer while he was pad­dling out for a heat. You wouldn’t see that hap­pen to­day. We were a bit more ca­sual and laid back in those days. As you can imag­ine the at­mos­phere was fan­tas­tic.

Derek Hynd (Pro surfer, writer, tac­ti­cian):

I was on the rocks in the fi­nal, only me­ters away from all the rides. It was a tight af­fair. Rincon was Tom’s worst lo­ca­tion on the whole Tour. The way I saw it un­fold, Cheyne re­ally wanted it out there. He made the board glide and slice dif­fer­ently to Tom’s ba­sic bot­tom-to-top turns and round­houses. That’s why Tom wasn’t into Rincon much. The wave didn’t have a crisp­ness to it. Noth­ing to pivot and blast off. Tom surfed a good fi­nal but the judges had to make a rad­i­cal choice about who won. It was one of the few times they faced a gulf in ap­proaches – how to score pros based upon al­ter­nate lines.

Cheyne Ho­ran: Tom was rid­ing a thruster and I was on the winged keel. And the keel was able to zip along those long sec­tions and fit ab­so­lutely ev­ery­where you wanted it on those waves and with su­pe­rior speed. It was the per­fect de­sign for that mo­ment.

Tom Car­roll: I didn’t truly be­lieve a winged keel could out per­form a thruster at Bells. And I was hum­bled.

TORQUAY PUB

James Reyne: The pre­sen­ta­tion night was done in the Torquay pub. We played. We put up a lit­tle stage in the pub and they gave out all the awards and then every­one kicked on. It was great fun and very loose. In fact, we shot a video to the song Boys Light Up around that time. Every­one par­ty­ing at Torquay pub.

Cheyne Ho­ran: I left be­fore the band started. I was com­pletely ex­hausted. My

speech? I think I re­mem­ber telling it how it was, how it is, how you feel. With­out step­ping on too many toes. What I re­ally re­mem­ber is my mind feel­ing free. That whole event, rid­ing that board, I felt this sense of free­dom. Val­i­da­tion of the de­sign. Bells is one of those con­tests that ev­ery Aus­tralian surfer wants to win. It’s our Wim­ble­don. For me, win­ning a bell was the next best thing to win­ning the World Ti­tle.

Terry Fitzger­ald: See­ing his win at Bells was pretty spe­cial, es­pe­cially con­sid­er­ing the blood­lines.

Doug War­brick: You can’t do much more than win one of the all time grand­slams of surf­ing.

AF­TER­MATH

Doug War­brick: The win on the keel cre­ated a lot of ex­cite­ment, a lot of surfers tried them. They were strong for a cou­ple of years there, they per­formed very well in cer­tain waves. I re­mem­ber in our surf­board fac­tory we were mak­ing glass winged keels to try them out. Some peo­ple said th­ese winged keels are go­ing well so we went “Aww yeah we bet­ter try them.” Tom Car­roll: Af­ter los­ing to Cheyne I went to Bali on a bit of a break to surf Uluwatu. Cheyne gave me a winged keel and I surfed 10 foot out­side corner on a 6’10’’with a winged keel and it was a nar­row tailed board and I was lov­ing it. I was sur­prised. It was a re­ally cool ex­pe­ri­ence.

Cheyne Ho­ran: I ended up selling the Bells board in Florida be­cause I needed to eat. That’s how the tour was. Ev­ery­body was selling boards to be able to eat. I had zero money so I sold it.

LEGACY

John Ber­trand: Suc­cess doesn’t just hap­pen. It’s the re­sult of peo­ple work­ing with each other and build­ing a sys­tem that can max­i­mize the op­por­tu­nity.

Ge­off Mccoy: Cheyne did what he wanted, not what oth­ers wanted him to do and the re­sult of this in­di­vid­u­al­ity was that the con­trollers of surf­ing took ev­ery op­por­tu­nity to ridicule and bla­tantly per­se­cute Cheyne, both in the con­tests and also in his pri­vate life. Shame on the es­tab­lish­ment for their un­der­handed be­hav­ior.

Derek Hynd: Cheyne’s wor­thy of a ton of re­spect for his en­dur­ing com­mit­ment. Cheyne Ho­ran: The keel to me, still is, the fastest fin on the planet.

Ge­off Mccoy: He could ride an old Dunny Door and make it work for him.

Cheyne Ho­ran: Other than the wing Ben and I were work­ing on all kinds of de­signs at the time. He gave me a thruster fin and said “This is what the thruster fin should be,” and about 5 years ago, I thought, “Man, I’ve gotta start do­ing all that stuff that we didn’t fin­ish!” So I’m still rid­ing Ben’s de­signs. All my boards, are pretty much 75 per cent Ben Lex­cen.

Ge­off Mccoy: Af­ter test­ing the winged keel my­self, I wrote it off as dys­func­tional and not for prac­ti­cal use in surf­boards. I did not and do not en­dorse them for my de­signs.

“THE JUDGES HAD TO MAKE A RAD­I­CAL CHOICE ABOUT WHO WON. IT WAS ONE OF THE FEW TIMES THEY FACED A GULF IN AP­PROACHES – HOW TO SCORE PROS BASED UPON AL­TER­NATE LINES.” – DEREK HYND

Hawkey

Open­ing Spread: The 80s – Far-out de­signs, shiny wet­ties & stink eye glares. What an age. (Craw­ford). Op­po­site: Ho­ran and Lex­cen fine tune. (Craw­ford)

Aus­tralia II Aus­tralian Crawl

Op­po­site: Util­is­ing the power – winged keel tech­nol­ogy would rev­o­lu­tionise yacht hulls, aero­plane wings and, for a brief mo­ment, surf­board fins. The less said about winged skateys the bet­ter. (Craw­ford)

Bondy & Ber­trand

Se­cret plans

Tom Cur­ren

War­brick

Op­po­site: Scenes from the fi­nal where the keel dom­i­nated the thruster and the vi­sion of Ho­ran and Lex­cen was val­i­dated. As James Reyne said, “Then the boys light up, then the boys light up. Then the boys light up, then the boys light up, light up, light up.” (Craw­ford)

Tom Car­roll

Ge­off Mccoy

Derek Hynd

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.