Tassie wool growth clipped

Tasmanian Country - - NEWS - KAROLIN MACGREGOR

The Aus­tralian Wool Pro­duc­tion Fore­cast­ing Com­mit­tee pre­dicts there will be no in­creased pro­duc­tion in Tas­ma­nia dur­ing the 2016-2017 sea­son.

TAS­MA­NIA is the only state where wool pro­duc­tion is fore­cast not to in­crease this year.

The Aus­tralian Wool Pro­duc­tion Fore­cast­ing Com­mit­tee re­leased its lat­est re­sults this week which pre­dicts there will be no in­creased pro­duc­tion in Tas­ma­nia dur­ing the 2016-2017 sea­son.

Across the coun­try how­ever over­all pro­duc­tion is ex­pected to be up.

The com­mit­tee has re­vised its fore­cast to 339 mil­lion kilo­grams greasy, which is a 4.3 per cent jump from 2015-2016.

Com­mit­tee chair­man Rus­sell Pat­tin­son said sea­sonal con­di­tions were a sig­nif­i­cant fac­tor.

“As the com­mit­tee ex­pected in De­cem­ber, the ex­cel­lent sea­sonal con­di­tions in vir­tu­ally all of the ma­jor sheep pro­duc­ing ar­eas of main­land Aus­tralia have re­sulted in higher av­er­age wool cuts per head this sea­son,” he said.

“Some states such as Western Aus­tralia, South Aus­tralia and Queens­land have seen the ben­e­fit from the im­proved sea­sonal con­di­tions through­out the 2016/17 sea­son and fleece weights are even bet­ter than the com­mit­tee pre­vi­ously ex­pected.”

How­ever for other states, in­clud­ing Vic­to­ria, the im­proved sea­sonal con­di­tions came later and av­er­age wool cuts per head have only in­creased at shear­ings from late spring on­wards.

“Th­ese ex­cel­lent sea­sonal con­di­tions com­bined with the high wool prices in the past few months have also en­cour­aged pro­duc­ers to re­tain older sheep to help re­build their flocks and for shear­ing,” Mr Pat­tin­son said.

Tas­ma­nian pro­duc­tion is pre­dicted to re­main steady at 9.1 mil­lion kilo­grams. Pro­duc­tion in Queens­land is ex­pected to jump by 23 per cent this year and by 9.1 per cent in Western Aus­tralia.

The 4.3 per cent fore­cast in­crease in shorn wool pro­duc­tion com­pares with a 4.7 per cent in­crease in the weight of wool tested by Aus­tralian Wool Test­ing Au­thor­ity in the first nine months of 2016-2017.

There has also been a 6.4 per cent in­crease in the first hand of­fer­ings of wool at auc­tion.

The com­mit­tee be­lieves that some wool, par­tic­u­larly ul­tra­fine wool, has been re­leased from the stocks held on­farm and also from stocks held in bro­ker’s stores in re­sponse to the high prices.

The AWPFC’s first fore­cast of shorn wool pro­duc­tion for the com­ing 2017/18 sea­son is for pro­duc­tion to be 340 mil­lion kilo­grams greasy.

This is a 0.4 per cent in­crease on the 2016-2017 fore­cast and re­flects small in­creases in the num­ber of sheep shorn and sim­i­lar av­er­age wool cuts per head.

The com­mit­tee noted that for the cur­rent sea­son to March, AWTA test data showed a sig­nif­i­cant in­crease in the weight of wool tested be­tween 20 mi­cron and 24 mi­crons but a de­cline in the vol­umes of 17 mi­cron and 18 mi­cron wool. This prob­a­bly mainly re­flects the ex­cel­lent sea­sonal con­di­tions.

Newspapers in English

Newspapers from Australia

© PressReader. All rights reserved.