DYED CON­TACT LENSES COULD HELP COR­RECT COLOUR BLIND­NESS

TechLife Australia - - HOTSPOT -

While the use of con­tact lenses is com­mon in cor­rect vi­sion, their use in cor­rect­ing colour blind­ness has, so far, been less so. But re­searchers at the Univer­sity in Birm­ing­ham have de­vel­oped a con­tact lens that uses a safe low-cost dye to rec­tify the is­sue. The most com­mon form of colour blind­ness is the in­abil­ity to dis­tin­guish be­tween red and green, mean­ing suf­fer­ers see a muddy yel­low, caus­ing is­sues with things like traf­fic lights. The newly de­vel­oped con­tact lenses utilise a dye made out of rho­damine, which ab­sorbs cer­tain wave­lengths of light be­tween red and green. When those wave­lengths are blocked, light is bet­ter ab­sorbed by the red-sen­si­tive and green-sen­si­tive cones in the eye, al­low­ing the suf­ferer to dis­tin­guish be­tween the two colours. The next step is to de­velop a sim­i­lar process to cor­rect pur­ple-blue blind­ness.

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