TIPS FOR WORK­ING IN AN IN­TER­NA­TIONAL SCHOOL

The Australian Education Reporter - - TEACHING INTERNATIONALLY -

1. PICK THE JOB, RATHER THAN THE CITY.

Un­less you are des­per­ate to live in a par­tic­u­lar place, pri­ori­tise find­ing the right school for you. The typ­i­cal path­way to em­ploy­ment is to at­tend a rep­utable Job Fair run by an or­gan­i­sa­tion such as CIS or Search As­so­ci­ates, but don’t rule out ap­ply­ing di­rectly to schools via their web­sites.

2. IN­TER­NA­TIONAL SCHOOL POL­I­TICS.

In­ter­na­tional schools are not sub­ject to the same level of reg­u­la­tion as their coun­ter­parts, and some can be ruth­lessly ‘for-profit’.

Per­haps a tooth­less board is all that stands be­tween your wel­fare and the kids.

So it’s cru­cial to try to make con­tact with oth­ers who have taught at the school to en­sure that staff is well treated and the work­ing con­di­tions are rel­a­tively favourable, in­clud­ing pay scale and teach­ing load.

3. TRAVEL.

The best pay­ing jobs are usu­ally in the Mid­dle East and north Asia, but it does vary de­pend­ing on the school and other as­pects of the pack­age. Ir­re­spec­tive of your salary, try to en­joy the op­por­tu­ni­ties to travel in the re­gion. It’s pos­si­bly half the rea­son you took the job in the first place!

4. MAIN­TAIN PRO­FES­SIONAL FO­CUS.

In­ter­na­tional school teach­ers can at times be guilty of play­ing too hard out­side the class­room. Re­mem­ber the job comes first, and in many cases the school com­mu­nity is very tight so your be­hav­iour does not go un­no­ticed. By all means blow off steam, but don’t blow your op­por­tu­nity!

5. CON­SIDER A CAREER IN IN­TER­NA­TIONAL ED­U­CA­TION.

Look for unique PD con­fer­ences and work­shops that ex­pand on is­sues par­tic­u­lar to in­ter­na­tional stu­dents, or about in­ter­na­tional ed­u­ca­tion in gen­eral.

It’s a boom­ing field filled with rich data to ex­plore. Get stuck into it!

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